Police officers and sheriffs deputies in riot gear forced protestors from The Great Lawn, claiming unlawful assembly, June 27, 2020, at the Aurora Municipal Center. Thousands gathered to protest and pay tribute to Elijah McClain, who died last year after an encounter with three officers from the Aurora Police Department.
Photo by PHILIP B. POSTON/Sentinel Colorado

A year after the state imposed reform mandates on the beleaguered Aurora Police Department, the tumult continues. 

Since the city entered into a consent decree with the Colorado Attorney General’s Office in 2021, three Aurora police chiefs have promised change. One, Vanessa Wilson, visibly pursued reform efforts and was fired. Another, Dan Oates, disbanded or diminished two internal oversight entities charged with monitoring police conduct and discipline. A third, Art Acevedo, was chosen to take the reins just a few months ago, even though he sued the last police department he was hired to fix.

To date, the consent decree — containing dozens of reforms to hiring, training and policies that city leaders advertised as the birth of a new era of equity and accountability — has played out amid rising crime rates and a dependable stream of complaints of officer misconduct. 

Without question, the challenge of at once tackling crime and reforming a department under fire for its disproportionate brutality against people of color is daunting and mirrors the reality facing urban police forces across the country. Police officials, including Acevedo, say the balancing act is at least possible.

The consent decree is meant to ensure oversight of the department as well as the kind of good-faith participation in reform efforts required to lower crime through more equitable policing. 

But one year in, the activists whose protests precipitated promised change say they’re skeptical that the consent decree will yield meaningful reform.

“I don’t think it’s had the impact that was believed at all,” said Candice Bailey, a local activist and former member of the Community Police Task Force, which was disbanded in 2021 after the Aurora City Council declined to extend its term. “It’s a lot of smoke and mirrors and performative action. What’s been done in the dark is the problem, and the lights are out.”

Some state lawmakers have become skeptical, too. 

State Sen. Rhonda Fields, D-Aurora, said that while police had continued working to drop the crime rate during the first year of the decree, they had made few new inroads with the communities most affected by police violence.

“We do have crime issues, and they’re addressing those,” she said. “But community engagement and involvement is something (police) say they value, but they haven’t really put steps or effort into showing they welcome that.”

In recent weeks, new controversies — over the promotion of one cop who escaped a drunk driving charge in 2019 and the arrest of another for allegedly attacking a disabled woman — have only fueled community concerns about police accountability.

APD Chief Vanessa Wilson shows one of two photos of the three police officers mocking the death of Elijah McClain at the site of McClain’s 2019 encounter with APD, during a July 3 press conference discussing the photos in question
Photo by PHILIP B. POSTON/Sentinel Colorado

Forced consent

The consent decree, and the current turmoil inside the department, can be traced back to a stunning episode of police brutality in August 2019.

Several months before the murder of George Floyd in Minneapolis sparked a global movement against police violence, Aurora police choked a 23-year-old Black man, Elijah McClain, until he passed out. When paramedics arrived, they injected him with what was deemed a fatal overdose of ketamine.

McClain was accosted by Aurora police while walking home from a nearby convenience store, where he’d gone for a can of iced tea.

In the weeks and months that followed, information about the killing trickled out of the police department. Officers justified their actions, saying McClain had been agitated and became aggressive. Then-police chief Nick Metz backed them up.

“I think overall the officers did a good job trying to calm Elijah down,” he said. 

Before retiring in 2019, Metz rejected calls for reform in media interviews.

“This is not a department that needs to be fixed,” he told the Denver Post. He stepped down from the department just a few months later amid a scandal where Metz protected the job of a drunken police officer who had passed out in his squad car and had to be rescued. 

Metz’s comments about McClain set the stage for a series of findings and pronouncements that favored the department’s version of his death. Union leaders insisted that the officers did nothing wrong.

An internal review board signed off on the officers’ decision to forcibly restrain and choke McClain, even as he cried and vomited on himself, stating that their actions were “within policy and consistent with training.”

In November 2019, former 17th Judicial District Attorney Dave Young said his office did not believe police had behaved criminally during the encounter with McClain.

Young’s decision not to treat McClain’s death as a crime inflamed tensions between activists and police, and stoked public outrage that coincided with unrest caused by the murder of Floyd.

As the summer heated up, state and local officials were bombarded with tens of thousands of calls and messages asking that the circumstances of McClain’s death be re-examined. More than a million people signed a Change.org petition demanding justice for McClain.

Ultimately, the killing of McClain was a pivotal moment for the city, despite the push against reform by Aurora police and factions within city leadership. 

In August 2020, Colorado Attorney General Phil Weiser announced his office’s investigation into police misconduct in Aurora and ultimately revealed a 32-count grand jury indictment against the officers and paramedics most closely involved in McClain’s death. He said the investigation revealed that Aurora police routinely used excessive force, particularly against people of color. 

He also accused Aurora Fire Rescue paramedics of illegally administering ketamine.

“The recent incidents involving Aurora Police have impacted not only community trust, but also officer retention and morale,” the report from Weiser’s office stated. “Many in the community perceive that Aurora Police does not hold accountable officers who use excessive force or otherwise engage in racially biased actions.”

Weiser’s investigation culminated in the city tacitly acknowledging the need for outside oversight of its police department by agreeing in November 2021 to operate under a consent decree.

Colorado Attorney General Phil Weiser explaining a new consent agreement with Aurora to oversee its police and fire departments. PHOTO BY PHILIP B. POSTON/Sentinel Colorado

Consent decrees: promises without admissions

A consent decree is a legal agreement, enforceable by a judge, in which none of the parties involved admits wrongdoing. The Aurora decree includes 70 reform mandates meant to break a pattern of excessive force and racial bias by police officers. They include:

  • Reducing racial disparities in arrest rates.
  • Reducing incidents of use of force.
  • Monitoring and updating use-of-force policies.
  • Increasing the number of minority candidates hired as police officers.
  • Reducing actual and perceived bias in policing.
  • Developing a new system for collecting data about police interactions with community members.

Once the department has adjusted its policies and training to meet the demands of the decree — which the decree says should take no more than two years from the day it began — a three-year monitoring period will commence.

To monitor the department’s compliance with the decree, the city hired IntegrAssure, a Florida-based risk-management firm led by former Manhattan prosecutor Jeff Schlanger. At a forum in early 2022, Schlanger promised impartiality, despite the fact that his firm’s work is being funded by $4.7 million from the city it’s charged with monitoring.

“There will be a contract … which essentially guarantees our independence,” he said. “But independence does not mean that we will not collaborate with the city and the city agencies.”

In a report published Jan. 15, IntegrAssure warned about missed deadlines, ongoing problems with the police entity tasked with reviewing use-of-force incidents and significant flaws in the department’s system for collecting information about stops of civilians, which IntegrAssure said prevents the city from complying with state law.

Of the 58 mandates scrutinized by IntegrAssure between August and November, half were said to be on a “cautionary track,” meaning the monitor questioned whether the city would be able to meet expectations.

“Both the Monitor and the City have gotten a better understanding of the capability, or lack thereof, for the APD to simultaneously deal with the substantial number of Mandates calling for significant change,” the report says.

“The Department, under the leadership of the new interim Chief has prioritized meeting these deadlines and has assigned additional resources to help make it happen.”

Much of the monitor’s concern stemmed from APD’s failure to meet deadlines for adopting policies having to do with stops, documenting contacts, uses of force and other topics. Some of the deadlines are several months past due, though the monitor said the delays were “understandable” and expressed optimism about the city coming into compliance in the near future.

On the other hand, the monitor praised the department for being close to rolling out a new “constitutional policing” policy, which is designed to help officers understand when they can legally stop, detain and arrest people. They said a final draft of the policy had been approved and would likely be rolled out in the coming months.

As it had in past reports, the monitor admonished the internal Force Review Board for its alleged reluctance to critically evaluate officers’ use of force, writing that “there is currently no critical analysis of officers and the number of use of force incidents in which they have been previously engaged.”

Part of measuring the department’s compliance with the consent decree will be a computerized system allowing officers to record information, including demographic data, about contacts with citizens. While Aurora police reportedly have set up a contacts form, the monitor said neither they nor the department had been able to pull aggregate data from the system.

The problem impacts the monitor’s ability to gauge how well the city is complying with the consent decree’s mandates designed to fight racist policing.

IntegrAssure also warned that the city was not able to submit information to the state to comply with the statewide law enforcement reform bill that laid the groundwork for the attorney general’s investigation of APD.

The monitor questioned whether an information technology unit should be set up within APD to facilitate the rollout of that system as well as changes to computer-aided dispatch, recordkeeping and other projects.

Both mandates having to do with accountability and transparency were deemed to be no more than 25% complete and on a cautionary track.

The monitor is responsible for signing off on new policies in APD, which is one of the ways they gauge the department’s compliance with the decree, along with participating in meetings like those of the Force Review Board, and evaluating enforcement data and other metrics.

Notwithstanding the city’s struggles with hitting the deadlines in the decree, the monitor again stressed that the city was cooperating with the reform process.

“The third reporting period of monitoring activity has been marked by cooperation and apparent good will of all parties and stakeholders in the process,” IntegrAssure wrote.

“While there are a few areas of significant concern, including concerns arising from missed deadlines, the Monitor believes there is genuine interest among the parties to achieve the goals of the Consent Decree and effectuate its provisions as quickly as possible so the resulting reforms are seen and felt on the streets of Aurora.”

Some community leaders, including Pastor Thomas Mayes, president of the Denver Ministerial Alliance, said they did not believe IntegrAssure is doing enough to challenge the police department on its compliance with the consent decree, and that too much of the work is happening out of public view.

“The community feels like that monitor is in the back pocket of the city,” Mayes said. Mayes announced this week he’s seeking a seat on the Aurora City Council during the November election. “I’m not that pleased with the work the monitor has done.”

After Wilson’s firing, which led activists to question the city’s commitment to reform, Schlanger, praised the city’s “exemplary cooperation” in the reform process at a news conference, saying that, “while we know that there are changes coming to the leadership of the police department, we fully expect, and in fact have been assured, that that degree of cooperation will continue.” 

Schlanger wrote in an email to The Sentinel responding to community concerns that the implementation of the consent decree was envisioned as a “marathon,” with the city taking around five years to update and fully implement policies, and retrain officers.

“It is not until the new policies are implemented on the street after appropriate training, that the full effect of reform will be able to be felt by the residents of Aurora,” he wrote.

“It is natural that there is frustration with the pace of change and we are working hard to explain the process and the progress that APD and AFR are making toward substantial compliance. We continue to seek out instances when residents of Aurora feel that members of their public safety agencies have acted inappropriately.”

Schlanger mentioned that the monitor’s website allows members of the community to communicate with them directly, and that they welcome feedback.

“Notwithstanding the fact that the full effect of the reforms has not yet been felt, I am confident that with the continued leadership and commitment of APD, AFR, and the City, both APD and AFR will be all that they can and must be for the residents of Aurora,” he wrote. “The process is designed and committed to making sure that happens.”

The attorney general’s office plays a nominal role in the enforcement of the decree, leaving IntegrAssure as the only eyes on the ground in Aurora.

Weiser said in statements that his office has been meeting regularly with the monitoring team and that they are “committed to ensuring that Aurora keeps the promises it made to improve and comply with state and federal law.”

Erin Plinyak, a deputy monitor with IntegrAssure, wrote in an email to The Sentinel that 11 people were working on the monitoring team for Aurora, with most of the work being done remotely.

“While there is not any team member who is physically in Aurora full time, the Monitor and members of the team are present in Aurora at least monthly for three to four days,” she wrote.

“That being said, there is full-time communication with the City through the various meetings, which the Monitor and team members attend virtually and scheduled and unscheduled check in calls with various members of both APD, AFR and (the Civil Service Commission), as well as with the Deputy City Manager, the City Attorney’s Public Safety Manager, as well as the Attorney General’s Office.”

Department spokeswoman Faith Goodrich wrote in a December email that members of the monitor team attend meetings with the police chief twice a week as well as weekly Force Review Board meetings, weekly discussions about the Force Review Board, weekly policy meetings and ongoing meetings about police recruiting and hiring.

Goodrich also said that, while the department was striving to meet the deadlines established by the decree, the goal of police was to successfully implement the reforms therein.

“The objective of all parties involved is to have the best end product, which means that while we strive to meet the deadlines, we are not going to substitute expediency for getting it right,” she wrote.

Aurora Interim Police Chief Dan Oates spoke with The Sentinel, May 31, shortly after beginning his role as the departments interim Chief.
Photo by PHILIP B. POSTON/Sentinel Colorado

5 chiefs in 3 years

Leadership changes, perhaps more than any other factor, have complicated the department’s ability or willingness to reform itself since the introduction of the consent decree.

In response to a question about the impact that unstable leadership had on APD’s ability to implement the goals of the decree, Goodrich wrote that “stability is critical to any organization, however, despite recent changes, the department continues to strive to meet the monitor’s goals.”

Upon being chosen to run the department by city management, Wilson said police treatment of non-white people was a “systemic problem” warranting change, but it would take time to fully address. During her tenure as chief, she fired police who had damaged the image of the department, including three officers who took photos imitating the death of McClain and a former union leader who sent an email to officers mocking the department’s program to recruit a more diverse pool of officer candidates.

Wilson’s firing in April fueled backlash and suspicion among some political leaders and activists, who accused the city of backing away from the goals of the agreement. City Manager Jim Twombly made the decision to oust Wilson after months of criticism of police leadership by new conservative council members.

While Twombly claimed Wilson’s firing was merit-based, Wilson said in a news conference she was fired for getting rid of problem cops and trying to reform the department. She has since pressed for a wrongful firing lawsuit against the city.

An attorney for the McClain family, Qusair Mohamedbhai, called Wilson’s firing “suspicious” and said the city was “already regressing soon after the ink has dried on the consent decree.”

Several Democratic state lawmakers in a joint statement warned that the action would “set back the critical and long overdue efforts currently underway in Aurora to ensure accountability and integrity in our police department.”

To replace Wilson, Twombly brought in retired Aurora police chief Dan Oates on an interim basis, and, despite assurances to the contrary, he immediately began big changes. He dismantled an internal police chief  review board and reduced the staffing of the Internal Affairs Bureau, only informing IntegrAssure of the decision after it was made.

“The dissolution (of the Chief’s Review Board) was clearly within the purview of the Consent Decree and the Monitor should have been consulted before dissolution,” IntegrAssure wrote in its quarterly report, saying it had discussed the problem with the city and that they had “received assurances from the City that such a failure will not occur again.”

“While Chief Oates’s dissolution of the Chief’s Review Board removed formal input from his staff in the process, Chief Oates indicated that he would confer with various members of his executive staff before rendering disciplinary decisions,” they wrote.

Oates managed all of this against the backdrop of an unfolding departmental scandal in which an Aurora police commander helped another officer violate a restraining order by illegally going to the home of the officer’s estranged wife.

The Sentinel and other outlets reported last year that Oates not only turned down a recommendation to discipline the commander involved but also promoted her to chief of the department’s patrol division. He also fired a new-hire police officer who was arrested out of state on alcohol and disorderly conduct charges, then reversed the firing, despite the officer being on, and having violated, probation.

Regardless, city management celebrated Oates and his six-month interim tenure when he left in December. City officials pointed to his efforts to reduce crime in the city, although analyzed data supporting those claims was not available.

The city’s first attempt to find a replacement for Wilson was a public failure. Two of the three finalists for the job dropped out amid criticism that the recruitment process was rushed and not transparent. Aurora’s City Council rejected the last remaining candidate.

In November, as the end of Oates’ contract neared, the city named Art Acevedo as Oates’ replacement, making him the third person to serve as police chief or interim chief in 2022. Oates described Acevedo as a personal friend and said he’d encouraged Acevedo to take the job.

During the summer of 2020, Acevedo was chief of the Houston Police Department. With the Black Lives Matter movement in full swing, he garnered national attention as a police leader open to calls for reform. In 2021, he left Houston to lead Miami’s police department, but the job was short-lived. He clashed with local elected officials over what he described as their meddling in cases of police discipline. Acevedo was fired from his job in Miami in October 2021 and filed a lawsuit against the city.

Acevedo has so far declined to say whether he will seek the permanent chief’s job in Aurora. His contract doesn’t bar him from applying. 

During conversations with The Sentinel, Acevedo said he did not “look at the consent decree as a challenge” but that he wanted to educate Aurora police and the public about what the decree requires of the department.

“I want our cops to understand that no one is saying they’re broken. The majority of people know that, 99 times out of 100, you’re doing great work,” he said.

“But just because you’re doing great work doesn’t mean that there hasn’t been instances where we can do better, and we want them to understand that this means that we’re going to be investing and provide them with the tools and the training and policies.”

Aurora’s newly appointed interim police chief Art Acevedo at a press conference Nov. 15, 2022 SENTINEL COLORADO/Philip B. Poston

APD can perform and change, chief says

On Jan. 17, Acevedo told The Sentinel that the department share’s the community’s desire to see the reforms in the consent decree enacted quickly.

“I’m thinking our greatest critic would agree that the majority of our officers are committed, thoughtful, professional, caring members of our public safety agency,” he said, adding that the problems identified by the attorney general’s office were “a failure, ultimately, of the people responsible for oversight of the department.”

The chief said changes in the chief’s office and tackling an increase in violent crime in particular have split the department’s attention between those priorities and implementing the decree.

He argued that it was more important for the department to enact reforms completely rather than implement them all on time.

“I’d rather be criticized for maybe taking more time than was desired by the monitor and the community than be criticized for not really implementing the best reforms and the best practices that are available to us,” Acevedo said. “There’s no science behind those deadlines.”

When asked whether he thought it was reasonable for members of the public to expect to see the decree having an impact in its first year, he said it would depend on which changes they were watching for.

As an example, he said it wouldn’t be enough to look at the frequency of officer-involved shootings and other use-of-force incidents, and that each incident needed to be evaluated individually to determine whether they were justified.

He added that the department is committed to reducing the use of force so that police use only minimal and lawful amounts of force during encounters with the public.

“To me, success looks like no arbitrary number in terms of deadly force encounters, because at the end of the day, if we have one deadly force encounter between police and an individual out in the public space, whether it’s one or 20, each one is a separate, standalone incident,” he said. “What success looks like to me is that when we have these incidents, that they are actually justified legally and morally.”

But community leaders remain concerned that the department’s institutional approach to dropping crime is simply more racially biased policing.  

Reflecting on the last year, state Sen. Rhonda Fields, D-Aurora, said she had seen mostly “more of the same” from the department, not the kind of change that comes from police working with communities.

“The city leadership really, in my view, is not interested in community engagement,” Fields said. “It was demonstrated in the way they fired Chief Wilson and the way they went through that process.”

City spokesman Ryan Luby pushed back on accusations that the city is not interested in community engagement, saying the department’s seven-person Community Relations Section participated in and hosted more than 200 community events since last May, in addition to offering educational programming to people who want to learn more about Aurora police.

Luby stressed that the section was created in 2021, and that “providing perspective on the section’s growth since its launch helps to underscore the time and commitment the department has invested in supporting the community it serves while rebuilding trust.”

“From the beginning of the process, we have consistently emphasized the importance of community voice and involvement,” city spokesman Ryan Luby said in a statement.

“Like former Interim Chief Oates and Chief Wilson, Chief Acevedo strongly advocates for productive community engagement opportunities and relational policing as he has in all his previous leadership roles around the country. As he continues to get his bearings in Aurora and build relationships internally and externally, he intends to increase the frequency of feedback sessions.”

The section was relocated from APD headquarters to the District 1 station in November, moving it away from the chief’s office but closer to patrol officers and where much of the section’s work is done geographically, according to IntegrAssure.

Information about progress on the decree is published on the monitor’s website in regular reports and has also been shared during town halls and in Aurora City Council policy committee meetings. The monitor also assembled an advisory group consisting of community members such as Mayes and Aurora NAACP president Omar Montgomery in 2022 to facilitate the exchange of information between the monitor and the public.

Fields expressed concern that police will continue to focus their efforts disproportionately on people of color. Driving along the Colfax Avenue corridor, she said, “there’s not a day that goes by when I don’t see a person of color sitting on the curb with their hands zip tied.

“They need to start addressing the issues in the consent decree that address racial bias in policing,” she added. “And as long as they lag behind, we’re going to see the same behavior demonstrated over and over again.”

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Blaze
Blaze
19 days ago

I lost interest before I got to the end, but some things jumped out early. These goals:

  • Reducing racial disparities in arrest rates.
  • Reducing incidents of use of force.
  • Monitoring and updating use-of-force policies.
  • Increasing the number of minority candidates hired as police officers.
  • Reducing actual and perceived bias in policing.

Every single one of these results in police behavior changes, such as avoiding troublesome situations, ceasing to engage, looking the other way, and dropping standards of quality and equality.

That doesn’t seem to be a mindset conducive to effective law enforcement.

If police are not empowered and protected, bad guys win because THEY don’t play by the rules.

Jim
Jim
19 days ago

5 APD Chiefs in 3 years. When there is this kind of revolving door at the top there is no way the necessary stability and commitment is present at the chief’s level to make meaningful changes mandated by the Consent Decree. What is going on right now is basically box checking and a lot of high sounding verbiage. Does anybody closely following this situation really think we Aurora residents are getting the bang for the buck we deserve? Maybe Integra can turn things around and earn their massive 4.7 million payout but the clock is ticking. Compliance with a legal document is a heck of a lot different than demonstrating and influencing measurable progress and tangible results. When Integra was awarded the contract they established a citizens advisory committee. I find it interesting neither its existence, its role nor its impact is even mentioned in the comprehensive piece Mr. Levy has written.

Good Citizen
Good Citizen
18 days ago

Keep in mind the scam of police “preventing crime” Ask, as a taxpayer, for real-world numbers in reference to the money that you have spent vs any reduction in crime statistics. There aren’t any. There are real numbers in reference to investigating crime and arrests that are connected to those investigations. I could care less who these welfare recipients beat up, Taze or shoot. I am interested in how much I pay to have them beat, Taze or shoot the public. Progressives/liberals are very interested in the color of the individuals these bums stop for walking or driving a car and phony conservatives will pick my pocket so that some clown in a costume can sit around on his butt in a squad car. The police will always ask a taxpayer if he is interested in this subject “because he has gotten a ticket” or “do you have any warrants?”. There is very little difference between the guy sitting in a tent on the side of the road collecting garbage in a grocery cart and these guys except that they will admit that they bums.

Blaze
Blaze
17 days ago
Reply to  Good Citizen

Please remember to avoid calling the “welfare recipients” the next time you are victimized, since they are of no help to you.

Last edited 17 days ago by Blaze
Good Citizen
Good Citizen
15 days ago
Reply to  Blaze

I have never been victimized and since I always carry a gun for self-protection the chance that one of the brilliant boys or girls in blue would attempt to kill me are very good. You shouldn’t be such a coward and step up to protect yourself instead of buying in on the protection racket offered by the police.

Don Black
Don Black
14 days ago
Reply to  Good Citizen

I would really be interested in what you do for a living that makes you sure that all police are bums who don’t work. I also would like to know what makes you a “good citizen”.

Good Citizen
Good Citizen
14 days ago
Reply to  Don Black

Sure. I have done many kinds of real work, including digging ditches with a pick and shovel, picking up garbage cans, cleaning bathrooms,
cement work, driving a delivery truck and the list goes on and on. Police run a protection racket, don’ t perform any profit based function and are welfare recipients. I am a good cititzen, since, unlike you I have paid my own taxes (police steal their’s from the public) and earn my money proving my worth by making a profit for my employer. I think that about covers it.

Justin
Justin
13 days ago
Reply to  Good Citizen

It sounds like your hatred for law enforcement, coupled with your inability to hold down a job, actually makes you the most likely recipient of government funding.

Good Citizen
Good Citizen
13 days ago
Reply to  Justin

Incorrect. After my experience actually working for a living, I began a business that sold a product and service to others. This went on for many decades. In my years as a working man and as a businessperson, I paid an inordinate amount of taxes that funded others that neither want to work or will, much like Don and his “law enforcement” comrades. Your use of the word “hatred” is a false flag that is used by almost all layabouts in our society. They are “hated” because they are black or perhaps because they are poor. It is cover for their laziness and inability to perform a useful function in society. Perhaps you fall into this classification. I certainly hope that you have taken advantage of what freedom has to offer, namely your ability to provide your employer (or customer) with a defined days’ work, rather than cheating the public out of their tax dollars.

Justin
Justin
12 days ago
Reply to  Good Citizen

I have no problem paying taxes and by ultimately a police officer’s salary. Not doing so would result in instant anarchy and everything I have worked for, would be targeted by those with loose morals. I don’t know why you are so jaded but to believe the police do nothing for society, is ridiculous. You have to look no further than any city burned down by the BLM riots. Police admin tells the cops to sit on their hands and you get BILLIONS of dollars worth of damage. Not a big deal right? Unless it’s your business, or livelihood stripped from you for political correctness.
When I was in the Army, I was unable to provide you with tangible benefits that you constantly demand of the police, was I and everyone else that served, a welfare riding tax cheat as well?

Good Citizen
Good Citizen
11 days ago
Reply to  Justin

It has nothing to do with political correctness in my case. I can look specifically at a riot and the ask for any real cost benefit statement in reference to the reduction in property damage to my property specifically. A very good example of of this is when the Korean owners of a liquor store simply mounted the roof of their establishment and offered to kill anyone that entered the store during a riot in LA. No one entered the store. What would have been the savings if a great number of property owners made the same offer, instead of being cowards and paying an overpaid group of tax cheats to do their fighting for them? After a riot, the police will show up and draw a chalk line around you. They have no skin in the game to protect you or your property and a real life cost benefit statement that they do or would is a fantasy and a fantasy of one that knows nothing of human nature.

Being a member of of the military is often a comparison used. I can speak from experience. Many of the young men that I knew in the Army had joined in the early 70’s simply because they were unemployable. Their “”work” (and mine) consisted of picking up cigarette butts, standing in a straight line and polishing boots. Things may have change somwhat over the years, but I doubt it.

Justin
Justin
11 days ago
Reply to  Good Citizen

It may not be in your case but political correctness is the driving force in any police department. If the police were allowed to do their job, the riots would not occur and the Koreans would not be forced to defend their property.
I also disagree that the police don’t have skin in the game as I’m sure many live in the city and have a vested interest in maintaining their property values as well as a safe place to raise their children.
As far as the military goes, things have changed. You may have seen the dwindling numbers and the forever wars that the military is being dragged into. Not too much time for picking up cigarette butts between constant deployments.
I do appreciate you for admitting to also being a welfare recipient and tax cheat, per your definition. Welcome to the club, I guess.

Good Citizen
Good Citizen
11 days ago
Reply to  Justin

The police aren’t “kept from doing their job” in the case of police protection since they don’t have a job to do. (They can’t do it) The riots would occur regardless of any policy of political correctness. There is absolutely no real-world information that they wouldn’t. Police, as they should be, are interested in protecting their property, not mine, as you just stated. I don’t have any interest in their children, and I would point out that the parents of the children at Uvalde school would agree that police have little interest in theirs. Your difficulty with constant deployment is yours. If you were hired to kill people that I don’t like, present a cost benefit statement in reference to killing people I don’t like. How much did it cost me per person? As your employer, I will decide if your efforts were effective. And you are correct, an early experience in the dangers of being a welfare recipient were invaluable, leading to the total rejection, unlike yourself, of that lifestyle.

Justin
Justin
9 days ago
Reply to  Good Citizen

There is a lot to unpack there but I am positive you would argue the fact that the sun rises in the East at this point.
If you cannot see the kowtowing by police departments to the activist du jour, you are living under a rock and are simply incorrigible.
Your selfish view of the police is also starting to appear troll-ish. Just because whatever interaction you had, that soured your view, there are countless more that are welcomed to learn the police have found their stolen car, that their assault suspect was arrested, that their abusive spouse was removed from the home, etc. The numbers are there, you just choose to be lazy and demand others do your research.
Your problem lies with the magnifying glass that officers are under and the resulting slowdown of pro-activity. The second is the courts, where judges have installed a revolving door on their courtrooms.
Uvalde is hopefully a one off as sadly, there are plenty of examples where cops have ended an active shooter much more quickly.
There ARE bad cops. Until the stigma of being one is gone and the hiring standards are raised to where they once were, departments will continue to get people that make headlines because they check a certain box and carry a G.E.D.
Lastly, I haven’t been in the military in decades. I have zero regrets because the life lessons learned were invaluable. For you to disown serving this country, even with its flaws, is embarrassing.

Good Citizen
Good Citizen
8 days ago
Reply to  Justin

“The police have found their stolen car, that their assault suspect was arrested, that their abusive spouse was removed from the house.” Great examples of the inability of police to protect anyone. They are examples of the ability of some individuals to investigate crime. I am sure you understand the distinction and why it is important to not pay someone for someone they can’t and will not do.

There aren’ t any bad cops. Only ones that are stealing the public’s money under the pretext of protecting them. I really have no concern about who they beat to death, only how much it costs me for them to beat someone to death. That is my magnifying glass.

You other points are a trite rehasing of phony conservative talking points. They simply out you as a fake that watches too much television

I don’t disown ” serving this country”. I never made any claim to doing so. Many of the individuals, the drunks the drug addicts, and perverts that were my colleagues in the Army never made that claim either.

I have never had any interaction with police and can only hope that one does not move into my neighborhood and reduce my property value.

Justin
Justin
8 days ago
Reply to  Good Citizen

Yep, either a troll or you are too far gone in your own echo chamber. Good neighbor next door program incentivizes cops, firefighters, teachers, EMT’s, etc., to buy in less than stellar neighborhoods in hope of bringing property values back up. That took all of 15 seconds to find. Start doing your own research. Good day.

Good Citizen
Good Citizen
8 days ago
Reply to  Justin

Not in my stellar neighborhood. And it didn’t take me in time to look it up.

the name is the game
the name is the game
9 days ago
Reply to  Good Citizen

Another masterpiece!

the name is the game
the name is the game
9 days ago
Reply to  Justin

Lordly. Good Citizen just keeps kicking butts on phony, boot licking “conservatives”. Don’t they hate it when the old man kicks them down the road? Amazing.

Don Black
Don Black
14 days ago

Unfortunately, lots of thoughts from people who have agendas but know little. As I have repeatedly said, the police reform bill and the consent decree are flawed in intent. I am sure that Rhonda Fields sees black people handcuffed on Colfax Ave. Unless we make it illegal to arrest black people or find a way for them not to be disproportionately involved in crime, that will continue. The police will continue to respond to calls for service and crimes. What they won’t be doing is much proactive work where they stop people for minor things. That means that you can expect crime to continue as is or worse. Community policing was supposed to be a partnership between the community and the police. That meant that the community would have input and a relationship with the police. Not allowing the police to have any input into new laws and trying to take away any legal protection is not really part of a partnership. The other part of community policing was that the police would listen to the community and be proactive in their approach. That means that when a citizen calls, the police would try to respond and handle their concern. Well, when you call about something suspicious, don’t expect the police to come in the current environment. Contacting suspicious persons is now taboo with the activists. The other part of community policing was for the officers to study crime problems, get citizen input, and try to come up with proactive solutions. So, neither side will do their part in the present environment.

You should not expect the officers to believe that the police reform bill or the consent decree are good things. They are not and they are a dishonest attempt to mollify the activist. I have challenged anyone to publicly debate the police reform bill. I also challenge anyone to defend the Attorney General’s use of past incidents with the APD. He has misrepresented the facts in most cases.

As for the monitor of the consent decree, I expect that he will continue to come up with policy nitpicking to justify all of that money. There was nothing wrong with APD’s policies. After serious incidents, chiefs always use the same line. They say they will review their training and policies. The initial comments by the monitor showed me that he knows little about use of force or investigations.

But, the game will continue. Truth will be the victim. Law enforcement will continue to be hamstrung by ridiculous, vague guidelines in the police reform bill. Until someone actually has the courage to stand up against all of the woke distortions, we will all suffer.

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