COLORADO VOTE 2022: Election results show Democrats winning across Aurora, state

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AURORA | Arapahoe County Democrats charged out of the gate Tuesday evening, as the initial results from the 2023 election showed Dem candidates leading in every race.

Watch with us as returns come in on Election Day and beyond.

Statewide Office Vote Count 2022

RaceCandidateArapahoe CountyDouglas CountyAdams CountyStatewideTotal
US SenatorD-Michael Bennet10247282287
6783810303311030331
US SenatorR-Joe O'Dea
618989545146955798921798921
GovernorD-Jared Polis107553898487505210850821085082
GovernorR-Heidi Ganahl573768890647305759989759989
Secretary of StateD-Jena Griswold100523808977090110113291011329
Secretary of StateR-Pam Anderson627469487949971810362810362
Attorney GeneralD-Phil Weiser990577813768975996172996172
Attorney GeneralR-John Kellner634469708150935822173822173
State Treasurer D-Dave Young977597624769220973136973136
State Treasurer R-Lang Sias629709624349247812686812686
1st Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressD-Diana DeGette1181009976299762
1st Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressR-Neal Walia379002304323043
4th Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressR-Ken Buck4496987483157181467181467
4th Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressD-Ike McCorkle431675119953113618113618
6th Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressD-Jason Crow9705413773738116893116893
6th Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressR-Steve Monohan56118124513577179971799
State Board of Education - At LargeD-Kathy Plomer958187584967144952164952164
State Board of Education - At LargeR-Dan Maloit62409945184901811758811758
State Board of Education - 6th Congressional DistrictD-Rebecca McClellan9061012573631109174109174
State Board of Education - 6th Congressional DistrictR-Molly Lamar60784131115587756777567

US SENATE SEAT

Bennet defends seat against O’Dea

Democrat Michael Bennet won reelection to the U.S. Senate on Tuesday, besting Republican businessman and first-time challenger Joe O’Dea.

Bennet won his third race on his pledge to protect abortion rights, an indication of how important the issue is to the blue-leaning state of Colorado. O’Dea was the rare Republican to support Roe v. Wade, the landmark abortion rights ruling that conservative justices on the U.S. Supreme Court overturned this summer. But that didn’t help him.

Bennet’s campaign hammered O’Dea on his opposition to abortions late in a pregnancy and on his support for the very GOP-appointed justices who overturned Roe.

Bennet and his backers dramatically outspent the novice candidate on the airwaves, while O’Dea only got rhetorical support from Senate Republicans in Washington, who never sent significant financial resources his way.

O’Dea tried to position himself as a future “Republican Joe Manchin,” referring to the conservative Democratic West Virginian senator as an example of a nonpartisan deal-maker who could end Washington gridlock. The son of a police officer, O’Dea said crime and the economy were his main concerns, not social issues. He had voted twice for Donald Trump, but O’Dea said he’d campaign against the former president in the 2024 GOP primary, citing better options like South Carolina Sen. Tim Scott and Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis.

Colorado voters didn’t buy it these midterms, cementing the state’s transformation from a competitive swing state early in the century to a more reliably Democratic one. Only one Republican, Cory Gardner, has won a federal race in Colorado since 2004, and voters ousted him from the Senate in 2020.

About 7 in 10 Colorado voters say things in the country are heading in the wrong direction, according to AP VoteCast, an expansive survey of more than 2,700 voters in the state.

About three-quarters of voters say the condition of the economy is either not so good or poor, the survey found, compared with about a quarter who call it excellent or good. About a third say their family is falling behind financially.

In deciding how to vote in Colorado’s U.S. Senate race, a vast majority — 9 in 10 — say party control of the chamber is a factor in their vote, and about half of voters say it is the single most important factor.

The Supreme Court’s overturning of Roe v. Wade also played a role in most voters’ decisions, with about 8 in 10 calling it a factor in how they cast their ballot. About a quarter call the court’s overturning of Roe the single most important factor in their vote.

— NICHOLAS RICCARDI, Associated Press

Statewide Office Vote Count 2022

RaceCandidateArapahoe CountyDouglas CountyAdams CountyStatewideTotal
US SenatorD-Michael Bennet10247282287
6783810303311030331
US SenatorR-Joe O'Dea
618989545146955798921798921
GovernorD-Jared Polis107553898487505210850821085082
GovernorR-Heidi Ganahl573768890647305759989759989
Secretary of StateD-Jena Griswold100523808977090110113291011329
Secretary of StateR-Pam Anderson627469487949971810362810362
Attorney GeneralD-Phil Weiser990577813768975996172996172
Attorney GeneralR-John Kellner634469708150935822173822173
State Treasurer D-Dave Young977597624769220973136973136
State Treasurer R-Lang Sias629709624349247812686812686
1st Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressD-Diana DeGette1181009976299762
1st Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressR-Neal Walia379002304323043
4th Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressR-Ken Buck4496987483157181467181467
4th Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressD-Ike McCorkle431675119953113618113618
6th Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressD-Jason Crow9705413773738116893116893
6th Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressR-Steve Monohan56118124513577179971799
State Board of Education - At LargeD-Kathy Plomer958187584967144952164952164
State Board of Education - At LargeR-Dan Maloit62409945184901811758811758
State Board of Education - 6th Congressional DistrictD-Rebecca McClellan9061012573631109174109174
State Board of Education - 6th Congressional DistrictR-Molly Lamar60784131115587756777567

 

6TH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT

Rep. Jason Crow, D-Centennial, celebrates his third win Nov. 8, 2022. Crow was first elected to Sixth Congressional District seat in 2018. Photo by PHILIP B. POSTON/Sentinel Colorado

Crow beats fellow veteran in bid for CD6

Aurora Congressman Jason Crow has won a third term, beating GOP challenger Steve Monahan, another veteran who joined the military in the wake of 9/11.

As of Tuesday evening at 9 p.m., Crow had more than 60% of the vote, possibly making it his biggest victory yet. Crow was first elected in 2018 when he beat then-incumbent Mike Coffman, who had been in Congress for a decade.

In 2020, Crow beat former Colorado GOP chair Steve House for the seat.

Monahan said on his Congressional campaign website that he ran “because of concerns about rising crime, inflation, parental role in their children’s education, immigration, and wariness of an encroaching bureaucratic state that can eventually eclipse liberties.”

— Kara Mason, Sentinel Managing Editor

Statewide Office Vote Count 2022

RaceCandidateArapahoe CountyDouglas CountyAdams CountyStatewideTotal
US SenatorD-Michael Bennet10247282287
6783810303311030331
US SenatorR-Joe O'Dea
618989545146955798921798921
GovernorD-Jared Polis107553898487505210850821085082
GovernorR-Heidi Ganahl573768890647305759989759989
Secretary of StateD-Jena Griswold100523808977090110113291011329
Secretary of StateR-Pam Anderson627469487949971810362810362
Attorney GeneralD-Phil Weiser990577813768975996172996172
Attorney GeneralR-John Kellner634469708150935822173822173
State Treasurer D-Dave Young977597624769220973136973136
State Treasurer R-Lang Sias629709624349247812686812686
1st Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressD-Diana DeGette1181009976299762
1st Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressR-Neal Walia379002304323043
4th Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressR-Ken Buck4496987483157181467181467
4th Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressD-Ike McCorkle431675119953113618113618
6th Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressD-Jason Crow9705413773738116893116893
6th Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressR-Steve Monohan56118124513577179971799
State Board of Education - At LargeD-Kathy Plomer958187584967144952164952164
State Board of Education - At LargeR-Dan Maloit62409945184901811758811758
State Board of Education - 6th Congressional DistrictD-Rebecca McClellan9061012573631109174109174
State Board of Education - 6th Congressional DistrictR-Molly Lamar60784131115587756777567

COLORADO GOVERNOR

Polis defeats Ganahl for reelection

Democrat Jared Polis handily won a second term as Colorado’s governor Tuesday, fending off a spirited challenge from Republican Heidi Ganahl, a business entrepreneur who was seeking to become the state’s first GOP governor since 2007.

Polis, a wealthy tech entrepreneur who’s largely self-funded his campaign, insisted that Colorado quickly emerged from the coronavirus shutdown poised for strong economic growth. He championed first-term successes in health care affordability, fully-funded kindergarten and preschool, and vowed to continue his relentless pursuit to move Colorado’s electrical grid to renewable energy by 2040.

President Joe Biden called Polis Tuesday evening to congratulate Polis on his victory, and, at a Democratic watch party at a Denver hotel, the governor thanked Ganahl and extended good will to those who voted against him.

“Whether you voted for me or not, I will work as hard as I possibly can on behalf of you and your family,” Polis said as his supporters hooted and hollered, brandishing signs reading, “Strong Steady Proven.”

During the campaign, Ganahl tried pinning the blame on Polis for inflation, surging crime, underperforming schools and opioid overdose rates affecting youth. She insisted she’d eliminate the state income tax and ask voters to reconsider a law signed by Polis enshrining the right to abortion into state law. Ganahl is a University of Colorado regent.

Ganahl campaigned on the slogan “#MadMom” as she tried painting an ominous portrait of the state. Polis countered by calling himself a “happy dad” of two kids who he is raising in what he called “the best state of all the states.”

About seven in 10 Colorado voters say things in the country are heading in the wrong direction, according to AP VoteCast, an expansive survey of more than 2,700 voters in the state.

About three-quarters of voters say the condition of the economy is either not so good or poor, the survey found, compared with about a quarter who call it excellent or good. About a third say their family is falling behind financially.

The Supreme Court’s overturning of Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that recognized a constitutional right to abortion, also played a role in most voters’ decisions, with about eight in 10 calling it a factor in how they cast their ballot. About a quarter call the court’s overturning of Roe the single most important factor in their vote.

Courtney Danis, a 20-year-old psychology student, said the main reason she voted for Polis is to protect abortion rights for all women — even though she long opposed abortion on a personal level. Citing the Supreme Court’s Roe decision, she said: “I realized things can happen to people without them choosing it … and it’s important to at least have a choice in (having an abortion).”

During the campaign Polis criticized Ganahl for appointing a running mate who has claimed that Joe Biden was not legitimately elected president in 2020.

A majority of Colorado voters — about three-quarters — say they are confident that ballots will be counted accurately, according to the poll, though about two in 10 say they are either not too confident or not at all confident.

James Hampl, 47, an engineer and registered Democrat, said he was voting for Ganahl because he feels Colorado Democrats have moved too far to the left and given too much leeway to criminals.

”(Democrats) are letting people get away with too much,” Hampl said as he voted in suburban Arvada. “We shouldn’t be far-right, and we shouldn’t be far-left. … We should be more central.”

— JAMES ANDERSON, Associated Press

 

Statewide Office Vote Count 2022

RaceCandidateArapahoe CountyDouglas CountyAdams CountyStatewideTotal
US SenatorD-Michael Bennet10247282287
6783810303311030331
US SenatorR-Joe O'Dea
618989545146955798921798921
GovernorD-Jared Polis107553898487505210850821085082
GovernorR-Heidi Ganahl573768890647305759989759989
Secretary of StateD-Jena Griswold100523808977090110113291011329
Secretary of StateR-Pam Anderson627469487949971810362810362
Attorney GeneralD-Phil Weiser990577813768975996172996172
Attorney GeneralR-John Kellner634469708150935822173822173
State Treasurer D-Dave Young977597624769220973136973136
State Treasurer R-Lang Sias629709624349247812686812686
1st Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressD-Diana DeGette1181009976299762
1st Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressR-Neal Walia379002304323043
4th Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressR-Ken Buck4496987483157181467181467
4th Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressD-Ike McCorkle431675119953113618113618
6th Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressD-Jason Crow9705413773738116893116893
6th Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressR-Steve Monohan56118124513577179971799
State Board of Education - At LargeD-Kathy Plomer958187584967144952164952164
State Board of Education - At LargeR-Dan Maloit62409945184901811758811758
State Board of Education - 6th Congressional DistrictD-Rebecca McClellan9061012573631109174109174
State Board of Education - 6th Congressional DistrictR-Molly Lamar60784131115587756777567
Colorado Attorney General Weiser poses with his family on Election Day. Photo by PHILIP B. POSTON/Sentinel Colorado

COLORADO ATTORNEY GENERAL

Tuesday evening results show AG Weiser with 11% lead over Kellner

Democrat Phil Weiser appeared to be on his way to securing another term as Colorado’s attorney general Tuesday evening, after initial results showed him leading opponent John Kellner by more than 11 percentage points.

Weiser has served as attorney general since 2019; during his re-election campaign, both Weiser and his opponent, 18th Judicial District Attorney John Kellner, focused on Weiser’s track record in court and as an advocate for legislation at a time when crimes such as car thefts rose statewide.

Weiser has said priorities for his second term in office would include defending the state’s gun control laws and promoting stricter firearm regulations, along with protecting children from social media companies and the vaping industry, and defending voting rights.

“Our democracy is not a spectator sport. It’s a team sport,” Weiser said at a debate in August. “The reason I want to continue is because we’ve got more work to do. We’ve made extraordinary progress. We’ve built a great team I’m proud of, and I want to see that work through.”

Kellner, meanwhile, questioned Weiser’s commitment to justice for crime victims and said that he would use the state’s grand jury system and other resources to combat trafficking in drugs such as fentanyl as well as lobby the legislature for harsher criminal penalties.

“Crime is crushing Coloradans,” Kellner said at the same debate. “It is soft-on-crime policies and laws that have been signed into law by Gov. (Jared) Polis and many times championed by people like Phil Weiser that have led us to where we are when it comes to crime.”

Street crimes such as motor vehicle theft and drug dealing not associated with racketeering are generally prosecuted by district attorneys and other prosecutors, while the state attorney general prosecutes fraud, human trafficking, multi-jurisdictional organized crime and homicides related to the drug trade.

The office also handles consumer protection cases, oversees the certification of police officers and represents state agencies in court, among other duties.

In 2021, the attorney general’s office under Weiser also reached an agreement with the City of Aurora and its public safety agencies, mandating certain reforms in the wake of Elijah McClain’s death.

Both Weiser and Kellner have said they are willing to hold police officers accountable for misconduct, with Kellner noting his prosecution of John Haubert, a former Aurora officer who was charged with assault and menacing for pistol-whipping and choking a man last year.

In Arapahoe County, initial results showed Weiser claiming around 59.8% of the vote to Kellner’s 38.5%. In Adams County, Weiser led with about 56.6% of the vote to Kellner’s 41.1%. In Douglas County, Kellner led with 53.4% of the vote to Weiser’s 45%.

— Max Levy, Sentinel Staff Writer

Statewide Office Vote Count 2022

RaceCandidateArapahoe CountyDouglas CountyAdams CountyStatewideTotal
US SenatorD-Michael Bennet10247282287
6783810303311030331
US SenatorR-Joe O'Dea
618989545146955798921798921
GovernorD-Jared Polis107553898487505210850821085082
GovernorR-Heidi Ganahl573768890647305759989759989
Secretary of StateD-Jena Griswold100523808977090110113291011329
Secretary of StateR-Pam Anderson627469487949971810362810362
Attorney GeneralD-Phil Weiser990577813768975996172996172
Attorney GeneralR-John Kellner634469708150935822173822173
State Treasurer D-Dave Young977597624769220973136973136
State Treasurer R-Lang Sias629709624349247812686812686
1st Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressD-Diana DeGette1181009976299762
1st Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressR-Neal Walia379002304323043
4th Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressR-Ken Buck4496987483157181467181467
4th Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressD-Ike McCorkle431675119953113618113618
6th Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressD-Jason Crow9705413773738116893116893
6th Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressR-Steve Monohan56118124513577179971799
State Board of Education - At LargeD-Kathy Plomer958187584967144952164952164
State Board of Education - At LargeR-Dan Maloit62409945184901811758811758
State Board of Education - 6th Congressional DistrictD-Rebecca McClellan9061012573631109174109174
State Board of Education - 6th Congressional DistrictR-Molly Lamar60784131115587756777567

COLORADO SECRETARY OF STATE

Partisanship permeates arguments for being less partisan on voting matters

After spending the better half of her first term in office defending election integrity, voters seem poised to send Jena Griswold back to run the Colorado Secretary of State’s office. 

She leads GOP challenger Pam Anderson by about 14 percentage points.

While the 2020 election brought on dangerous rhetoric about the nation’s voting system — and some conservatives have embraced lies spouted by former President Donald Trump and his supporters — the candidates for Colorado Secretary of State, which oversees elections among other duties, both agree that the process is safe and sound here. 

The point of contention in the race, however, is that hyper-partisan actions put election integrity at risk across the state. 

“I am running to restore confidence in the position by bringing my background and record of performance as a professional and nonpartisan election official,” GOP candidate Pam Anderson, a former county-level clerk and recorder, said in a recent Sentinel candidate survey. “I am running because I have seen up close state and local election officials use the public’s trust and these offices to elevate themselves with hyper-partisan rhetoric.” 

Anderson has worked in elections since 2003, when she was named the city clerk for Wheat Ridge. 

She beat out election-denier Tina Peters, who was indicted on criminal counts of conspiracy related to election tampering and misconduct in Mesa County, and another Republican candidate in the June primary to face incumbent Jena Griswold, the current Colorado Secretary of State. Griswold was a voter protection attorney prior to running for office in 2018. 

Griswold, a Democrat, garnered pushback, even from some in her own party, earlier this fall when she appeared in a television ad alongside former Secretary of State Wayne Williams, a Republican, that asks voters to be “alert” about election misinformation. The ad wasn’t paid for by a political group, but rather an account from the Secretary of State’s office that’s supposed to be used for election equipment and software upgrades.

Anderson called for the ads to stop, telling Axios that “the priority for this secretary is herself.”

While politics have elevated the historically mundane seat, Griswold told the Sentinel in a survey that taking the politics out of the position – perhaps by the governor appointing a secretary through Senate confirmation – could lead to even more trouble.

“In states where the Secretary of State is appointed and not accountable to the people, we are seeing election deniers in these positions,” she said. “In fact, there are Big Lie appointed Secretaries of State in Texas and Florida, and if the Big Lie Governor candidate in Pennsylvania is elected he has pledged to appoint someone who will get rid of all voting equipment and unlawfully purge voter rolls.”

Beyond elections, the secretary of state office oversees lobbyist regulation, bingo and raffle laws, business and charity compliance and campaign finance law. 

Both have said they’d like to see increased transparency in campaign finance. 

“This is entirely possible with improved technology,” Anderson said. 

Griswold said she believes dark money — donations, usually from mega donors, that cannot be tracked because it typically funnels through several organizations — should be disclosed. 

“As Secretary of State I will always work to ensure Colorado’s elections are not decided by wealthy corporate interests instead of everyday people,” she said. 

— Kara Mason, Sentinel Managing Editor

Statewide Office Vote Count 2022

RaceCandidateArapahoe CountyDouglas CountyAdams CountyStatewideTotal
US SenatorD-Michael Bennet10247282287
6783810303311030331
US SenatorR-Joe O'Dea
618989545146955798921798921
GovernorD-Jared Polis107553898487505210850821085082
GovernorR-Heidi Ganahl573768890647305759989759989
Secretary of StateD-Jena Griswold100523808977090110113291011329
Secretary of StateR-Pam Anderson627469487949971810362810362
Attorney GeneralD-Phil Weiser990577813768975996172996172
Attorney GeneralR-John Kellner634469708150935822173822173
State Treasurer D-Dave Young977597624769220973136973136
State Treasurer R-Lang Sias629709624349247812686812686
1st Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressD-Diana DeGette1181009976299762
1st Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressR-Neal Walia379002304323043
4th Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressR-Ken Buck4496987483157181467181467
4th Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressD-Ike McCorkle431675119953113618113618
6th Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressD-Jason Crow9705413773738116893116893
6th Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressR-Steve Monohan56118124513577179971799
State Board of Education - At LargeD-Kathy Plomer958187584967144952164952164
State Board of Education - At LargeR-Dan Maloit62409945184901811758811758
State Board of Education - 6th Congressional DistrictD-Rebecca McClellan9061012573631109174109174
State Board of Education - 6th Congressional DistrictR-Molly Lamar60784131115587756777567

COLORADO STATE TREASURER

Dave Young defends treasurer seat against former Lt. Gov. candidate

Colorado Treasurer Dave Young has been elected to another term. The former Greeley legislator beat fellow former lawmaker and Lt. Gov. candidate Lang Sias.

As of Tuesday evening, statewide results showed Young 10 points ahead of his opponent.

“I’m incredibly grateful for the support and trust Coloradans have in the work we are doing at the Treasury,” Young said in a statement to reporters. “I ran for State Treasurer bc I believe in economic justice for all, and I’m excited to continue to work towards that goal for another four years.” 

Made up of four divisions — the investments division, the cash management division, the accounting and administrative division, and the unclaimed property division — the treasurer’s office is essentially the state’s banker, but with additional duties. The treasurer is responsible for the state’s “banking, investment, and accounting services for all funds and assets deposited in the Treasury,” explains the state.

Amid Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, Colorado’s state pension fund, controlled by the treasurer, divested more than $7 million from Russia’s largest financial institution and $800,000 more from other Russian companies. Colorado’s state portfolio doesn’t hold any Russian assets.

Young said on his campaign website that his top goals in the elected seat are to protect taxpayer dollars, protect the state economy and protect PERA, the pension fund for state public workers. 

“In this role, we operate similar to a household balancing its budget. This process becomes more and more complex as there are many state departments and agencies that all disburse funds and the Treasury tracks all of those expenditures. The Treasury must run efficiently and effectively to manage cash flow, so that Colorado will be able to cover its obligations such as school funding, road improvements, paying our public employees, and so much more,” Young says on his website. 

The pandemic led to major fluctuations in state finances, but Young says because of the office’s hard work, “Coloradans did not face additional economic distress.”

Sias said if elected, his top priority would be to fight economic inflation.

— Kara Mason, Sentinel Managing Editor

Statewide Office Vote Count 2022

RaceCandidateArapahoe CountyDouglas CountyAdams CountyStatewideTotal
US SenatorD-Michael Bennet10247282287
6783810303311030331
US SenatorR-Joe O'Dea
618989545146955798921798921
GovernorD-Jared Polis107553898487505210850821085082
GovernorR-Heidi Ganahl573768890647305759989759989
Secretary of StateD-Jena Griswold100523808977090110113291011329
Secretary of StateR-Pam Anderson627469487949971810362810362
Attorney GeneralD-Phil Weiser990577813768975996172996172
Attorney GeneralR-John Kellner634469708150935822173822173
State Treasurer D-Dave Young977597624769220973136973136
State Treasurer R-Lang Sias629709624349247812686812686
1st Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressD-Diana DeGette1181009976299762
1st Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressR-Neal Walia379002304323043
4th Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressR-Ken Buck4496987483157181467181467
4th Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressD-Ike McCorkle431675119953113618113618
6th Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressD-Jason Crow9705413773738116893116893
6th Congressional District U.S. Rep to CongressR-Steve Monohan56118124513577179971799
State Board of Education - At LargeD-Kathy Plomer958187584967144952164952164
State Board of Education - At LargeR-Dan Maloit62409945184901811758811758
State Board of Education - 6th Congressional DistrictD-Rebecca McClellan9061012573631109174109174
State Board of Education - 6th Congressional DistrictR-Molly Lamar60784131115587756777567

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION

State school board seat for Aurora’s CD6 brings Cherry Creek schools roots to the forefront

Democratic incumbent Rebecca McClellan is running for a second term representing the Colorado State Board of Education’s Centennial-based 6th district against Republican challenger Molly Lamar.

First elected in 2016 to serve a six-year term, McClellan was previously a member of the Centennial city council from 2006 to 2014, during which time she was a liaison to the Cherry Creek School District. Lamar, a former elementary school teacher and parent of four in the Cherry Creek School District, has no prior political experience but was involved in the campaign to elect Jenniffer Gibbons to the CCSD school board. She was interviewed by conservative news site the Daily Caller during the election.

McClellan, who has touted her work expanding full-day kindergarten in Colorado, is campaigning on increasing access to preschool, helping all students read by third grade, managing federal pandemic relief funds for educational recovery and creating multiple pathways for high school graduates beyond traditional four-year college.

Lamar’s main issues are improving school safety, giving parents more of a voice in education and improving academic outcomes, according to her campaign website.

“School districts are spending exorbitant amounts of money on divisive programs that do little to improve academic outcomes,” her website states. “We need to hold our schools accountable through sical transparency to ensure funds are invested in the classroom instead of adding more administrators with six-figure salaries.”

The board is moving from seven to nine seats with this election, adding a representative from Colorado’s new 8th Congressional District as well as an at-large member to keep it odd-numbered.

In response to a Sentinel questionnaire, the candidates said that they did not believe it was the role of the state board to micromanage what gets taught in the classroom.

“There is a partisan effort to label any lessons that touch on how race and racism has intersected with history, culture, and society as critical race theory,” McClellan said. “The truth is that the majority of parents and voters, in poll after poll, say that they want students to learn about how slavery and racism shaped our history and to learn about how racism still impacts society today.”

Lamar said that those types of decisions should be made at the level of the local school board.

“The state doesn’t have oversight of the curriculum used in the district, so the state has no authority to investigate the things being taught in the district,” she said. “This enables parents and community members to hold their local school board members accountable for what is being taught in classrooms.”

Educators in Colorado and nationwide have also struggled with the deleterious academic effects of the pandemic. According to recently released statewide testing scores, Colorado students performed better than they did last year but have yet to catch up to pre-pandemic levels.

Both candidates said in their questionnaires that they believe providing resources for targeted tutoring is a key part of helping students make up academic ground, and McClellan said that the state needs to increase its strategies for recruiting and retaining educators without lowering the qualifications needed to teach, which has been done by some other states.

— CARINA JULIG, Sentinel Staff Writer

Statewide school board seat split on what basics should be

In the new at-large seat, former Adams 12 school board President Kathy Plomer, a Democrat, is running against Republican Dan Maloit, a veteran and St. Vrain Valley School District parent who became politically active arguing for schools to reopen.

Maloit said he wants to support teachers, get back to basics, and bring a parent perspective. A founder of the Colorado Alliance for In-Person Learning, Maloit said voters will — and should — remember decisions made in 2020 and 2021.

“We both said we wanted kids back in school,” Maloit said. “She was a school board president, and those kids stayed out of school pretty long. I said, ‘I want to get back in school,’ and I risked my family’s livelihood and personal reputation to put them back in there. I think that that’s going to matter.” 

Plomer said she’s happy to have that debate. Board members made the best decisions they could with the information they had at the time, she said, while facing criticism from all sides. 

But she prefers to talk about what kids and schools need now. She first got involved years ago as a parent volunteer when her oldest started kindergarten, and she served on the Colorado Association of School Boards’ executive committee, a position she says exposed her to issues facing districts around the state, including in far-flung rural districts.

“At this time, we need people who understand the system,” she said. “There are no soundbite answers to our questions. We need to have tough conversations.”

— By Chalkbeat Colorado

Candidate NameLegislative SeatDistrictPolitical PartyIncumbentArapahoe CountyAdams CountyDouglas CountyDenver CountyTotal Votes
Tom SullivanState Senate27Democratic PartyN2546901198026667
Tom KimState Senate27Republican PartyN1989601221021117
Robert RodriguezState Senate32Democratic PartyY11890001189
Dean FlandersState Senate32Republican PartyN394000394
Elisabeth EppsState House06Democratic PartyN00000
Donald D. HowellState House06Republican PartyN00000
Leslie HerodState House08Democratic PartyY00000
Hilleary WatersState House08Republican PartyN00000
Emily SirotaState House09Democratic PartyY37310003731
Tom CowhickState House09Republican PartyN11720001172
Dafna Michaelson JenetState House32Democratic PartyN09399009399
Justin BrownState House32Republican PartyN07304007304
Mike WeissmanState House36Democratic PartyY46413588008229
William WaltersState House36Republican PartyN28541401004255
Ruby DicksonState House37Democratic PartyN1627800016278
Paul ArcherState House37Republican PartyN125100000
David OrtizState House38Democratic PartyY1633700016337
Jaylen MosqueiraState House38Republican PartyN1130300011303
Naquetta RicksState House40Democratic PartyY1279400012794
Le SellersState House40Republican PartyN79040007904
Iman M. JodehState House41Democratic PartyY1249400012494
Stephanie HancockState House41Republican PartyN69120006912
Mandy LindsayState House42Democratic PartyY73280007328
Cory ParellaState House42Republican PartyN29290002929
Kathleen J. ConwayState House56Democratic PartyN15571078002635
Rod BockenfeldState House56Republican PartyY25613408005969
Eliza HamrickState House61Democratic PartyN1320001246014446
Dave WooleverState House61Republican PartyN1196201393013355

CAPITOL IDEAS: Aurora State House and Senate races

Mike Weissman of HD36 faces Republican outsider William Walters in re-election bid

Mike Weissman is seeking his fourth term in the Colorado House of Representatives this fall, squaring off against retired Denver police sergeant William Walters.

Walters, a career law enforcement officer, said during the campaign he supported the repeal of Colorado’s Senate Bill 20-217, which stripped police officers in the state of qualified legal immunity, required them to intervene and make a report when other officers use excessive force and mandated that more police officers wear and use body-worn cameras.

He specifically objected to the expanded powers granted to the Colorado Peace Officer Standards and Training board, part of the Colorado Attorney General’s Office, to punish police officers for misconduct. Walters’ campaign website accuses legislators of failing to focus on community safety and calls for greater public support for police officers.

“There are a lot of good ideas and worthy goals in SB20-217,” Walters wrote in the Sentinel survey. “But SB20-217 is a nightmare for our communities’ safety and our local control of law enforcement.”

Weissman stood behind SB20-217 and said in his survey that he was proud to have voted for a follow-up House bill which clarified how body-worn camera footage is to be handled and the relationship between police misconduct and POST certification.

“Talk of blanket repeal just misses the many important issues that were taken up in that bill and dismisses the concerns that communities of color, in particular, have had for a long time,” Weissman wrote. “I have also supported numerous measures over the years for peace officer mental health support. Everyone — from the police to the community — benefits when officers have this kind of assistance available.”

— MAX LEVY, Sentinel Staff Writer

HOUSE DISTRICT 37

Democrat Ruby Dickson and Republican Paul Archer duel for open HD37 seat

Economist Ruby Dickson, a Democrat, and business owner Paul Archer, a Republican, will vie for the Colorado House of Representatives seat serving parts of Greenwood Village and Centennial, and the area south of Cherry Creek State Park this fall.

Education, abortion access and public safety were some of the issues where Dickson and Archer articulated different priorities in their Sentinel surveys and in other campaign materials.

Archer approached public safety from the angle of crime, advocating for reintroducing felony penalties for certain crimes and increasing funding for law enforcement on his campaign website.

While he was critical of Senate Bill 20-217 and its elimination of qualified immunity protections for police, he said he would support independent oversight groups that could evaluate uses of force and deaths related to contacts with police.

“I am fully aware that there have been problems within the force, not just in Colorado but all over,” Archer’s website reads. “The radical increase in crime clearly shows us that defunding the police is not the right pathway to follow. The solution is to have officers invested in the communities that they serve.”

Dickson did not directly answer questions about her feelings on SB20-217. Under the heading of “safer communities,” her website describes the need to regulate firearms to curb the risk of school shootings.

“Most of us believe that schools should be gun-free zones. We believe in common sense gun safety rules, like temporarily taking weapons away from people that have been medically certified to be a threat to themselves or others,” she told The Sentinel. “Colorado has already experienced too much pain at the hands of those wielding extremely deadly weapons. We can — and must — do more to prevent the next mass shooting.”

The two both addressed the topic of abortion, with Dickson saying on her website that “no compromises” should be made in terms of guaranteeing womens’ access to the procedure and Archer saying on his that he was in favor of blocking late-term abortions and “protecting the rights of the unborn, with exceptions to rape, incest and health of the mother.”

Archer and Dickson both wrote about the need to pay teachers more, and Archer said he believed schools should refocus on fundamentals like language arts and math. Dickson stressed her support for public education, saying that “private schools may work well for a select few, but supporting our public school classrooms is the way to help improve outcomes for our children.”

The House District 37 seat is currently held by Democrat Tom Sullivan, who defeated Republican challenger ​​Caroline Cornell in 2020, earning 55.6% of the vote. Instead of running for re-election, this year, Sullivan is running to replace Democrat Chris Kolker in Senate District 27.

— MAX LEVY, Sentinel Staff Writer

HOUSE DISTRICT 40

 Republican Le Sellers challenges incumbent Naquetta Ricks for HD40 seat

Le Sellers, a U.S. Army vet with experience in technical writing and investing, will challenge Naquetta Ricks for a seat in Colorado’s House of Representatives this November, as Ricks seeks a second term in office.

Both candidates for District 40, which includes south and east Aurora, identified criminal justice as a focus for the upcoming legislative session, but while Ricks advocated for alternatives to prison and traditional policing in schools in her campaign materials, Sellers warned about rising crime and signaled his support for so-called “truth in sentencing” laws and funding police.

“Crime is at record levels in Colorado. Police are demoralized, underpaid and handcuffed in how they respond to crime and criminals,” his website reads. “Judges should have the latitude to serve justice, but criminals should know they will pay the price for their evil choices and actions. It’s the legislature’s job to set the parameters so we can all feel safe!”

Ricks wrote about divesting from private prisons, promoting restorative justice and expunging all marijuana offenses to help former drug defendants. She also said she was wary of law enforcement in schools resulting in the incarceration of children.

“The presence of police in schools should be for safety and security, not the expectation of contact with children to issue tickets and / or citations,” Ricks’ website says. “Our children need mental health professionals, parent-staffed campus liaisons, and social workers that are equipped to handle and treat behavior issues instead of criminalizing students.”

Ricks, a small business owner herself, also said she was committed to making sure the state supports minority- and woman-owned businesses, saying the federal government too often favors large corporations.

On the subject of the economy, Sellers said he wants to see the state step up domestic energy production and lift regulations on businesses.

“Colorado is dealing with record inflation, higher than the national average,” Sellers’ website reads. “Higher taxes (disguised as fees) also make life more expensive. While much of this is the fault of national policies, Colorado can do better.”

Sellers also talked about education, alleging that schools are no longer focused on teaching foundational skills like reading and math but instead have “a hidden agenda, the sexualization of the youngest in society.” He said he wants to promote transparency around the curriculum taught in schools

Ricks said she wants to raise more money for schools and promote programs that help graduates gain employment.

“Our children need to be prepared for the high paying jobs of today and the emerging industries of tomorrow,” her campaign website says. “I will advocate for more entrepreneurial programs and apprenticeship programs in our schools.”

Colorado’s general election is scheduled to take place Nov. 8.

— MAX LEVY, Sentinel Staff Writer

HOUSE DISTRICT 41

Jodeh running for re-election in HD41, challenged by Hancock 

Incumbent Democrat Iman Jodeh is running for re-election to her House seat representing west and central Aurora, challenged by Republican Stephanie Hancock.

One challenge facing all of Colorado and especially the urbanized Denver metro area is housing affordability — Hancock and Jodeh both identified the development of affordable housing as a priority, with Jodeh suggesting that Colorado’s General Assembly take legislative action to let cities introduce inclusionary zoning laws.

Under current Colorado case law, specifically a Colorado Supreme Court ruling known as the “Telluride decision,” inclusionary zoning, which requires homebuilders to incorporate affordable housing into their developments, is considered rent control and is not permitted.

“I support loosening the constraints on the options local governments have to address affordability,” Jodeh’s website states. “Let’s get serious about affordability & override the Telluride decision with legislative action.”

She also supports ​​protections against evictions without notice, bills and fines for renters.

Hancock said she supports cutting the costs of housing by reducing and eliminating construction fees, incentivizing income-based housing “with caveats” and promoting alternative housing units such as tiny homes.

On the topic of crime, Hancock blamed “pro-crime policies of defunding police and the reduction of penalties for breaking laws” for neighborhoods becoming less safe. She said she plans to work with prosecutors and police to train, fund and equip law enforcement; organize neighborhood watch programs and strengthen laws to discourage violence and drug sales.

“Illegal drug use and distribution, notably fentanyl, is devastating our youth,” her website reads. “The problem is growing and our legislature’s lack of leadership is making matters worse. Our living and work environments must be safe.”

Jodeh’s public safety platform focuses on reducing incarceration through investments in restorative justice, fee-free diversion and probation programs, and reductions in felony sentences. She also denounced private prisons and said she supported expunging misdemeanors related to marijuana.

Jodeh said she would also like to explore creating an independent unit within the Attorney General’s Office that would have exclusive jurisdiction over use-of-force cases

“While some find justice in our criminal justice system, for too many it unjustly ruins lives. Our justice system must be focused on rehabilitation, equity, & accountability,” her website states.

Regarding education, Jodeh said she was supportive of state-funded pre-K services and efforts to help reduce the cost-of-living for teachers in addition to better wages such as subsidized housing for teachers, loan repayment programs and recruitment programs that “increase diversity and employ teachers from the school’s neighborhood.”

Hancock described the district’s education system as “failing” and said she is supportive of school choice; trimming administrative costs so more money goes toward teachers; centering education on grammar, logic, rhetoric, arithmetic, geometry, music and astronomy; and promoting vocational programs in middle and high school.

“Our current education system is failing. All kids are not college-bound but should have the opportunity to learn vital skills that provide them the opportunity to contribute as full-fledged citizens,” her campaign website states.

— MAX LEVY, Sentinel Staff Writer

 

HOUSE DISTRICT 42

Incumbent Mandy Lindsay faces Republican challenger Cory Parella in House District 42

Mandy Lindsay is defending her House District 42 seat representing north and central Aurora from a challenge by Republican Cory Parella this fall.

Lindsay’s campaign platform includes creating housing options for all, repealing TABOR to help fund Colorado schools, stewarding the environment, improving access to health care and mental health care, and promoting abortion access.

In her Sentinel survey, she proposed to ban corporations from owning single-family homes and cap the number of non-owner-occupied residences. She also said she believed everyone in her district deserves housing, whether in homes, apartments or temporary housing for vulnerable groups.

“In communities like ours, the dream of homeownership is being snatched away (and the opportunity to grow wealth / generational wealth is becoming non-existent) and rents are rising sky-high, and as the cost of housing becomes completely unaffordable, more people will become unhoused,” Lindsay warned in her survey.

To lower the cost of health care, Lindsay proposes to expand the public option, which she says will also increase the number of providers available and promote transparent pricing. She described health care as a “human right” and said she believed the industry should not be for-profit.

“Every one of us should have access to quality and affordable healthcare that stays with us no matter where we live, or what  job we have,” Lindsay’s campaign website says. “Behavioral health is also an essential part of healthcare and we need to give people facing mental health challenges the same urgency and support for treatment as we would a patient with a broken arm.”

Abortion access was also highlighted as a priority for Lindsay, who said in her survey that her vote in favor of Colorado’s Reproductive Health Equity Act earlier this year was “easily one of the best votes I took this past session.”

“We have taken for granted the right for people to decide if, when, and how they become parents,” she wrote on her website. “Colorado must continue to bolster our citizens’ rights and stand out as a beacon for reproductive freedom in the region.”

Parella has a website, a YouTube channel, profiles on social media websites and multiple self-published books that address his religious beliefs and conservative politics.

The key issues of Parella’s campaign as expressed on his campaign site include “making abortion obsolete” by calling “on Science to make an artificial uterus to protect the lives of both mommy and baby,” creating a licensing program for Colorado’s film industry and repealing the Enhance Law Enforcement Integrity Act.

“This matter will not be resolved in an assembly or court room,” Parella said on the topic of abortion in his Sentinel survey. “I call on science to deliver an artificial uterus to sustain life from conception through self-sufficient breathing and nutrient consumption. And maybe this will cure miscarriages?”

Parella also made light of the Reproductive Health Equity Act and said that he supported the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.

On the topic of the entertainment industry, Parella promoted the idea of professional licensing for filmmakers, saying the film industry had the potential to be an economic driver for the region.

“‘Star Wars’ and ‘The Godfather’ made San Francisco a financial power,” his campaign website reads. “Movie DNA and year-round sporting events will give this part of the State more life than the southern counties. Get ready to prosper. Or move.”

He also wrote at length about public safety in the Sentinel survey, saying he thought Senate Bill 20-217 had been a “disaster” and questioning sympathetic accounts of the police beating of Rodney King and the death of Elijah McClain.

He blamed specific Democrat lawmakers for public safety problems, particularly state Sen. Rhonda Fields, who he suggested was “dyslexic” and said unfairly accused police of racial profiling.

Parella advocated for a mix of public safety policies, including enforcement of anti-panhandling laws, amending Colorado’s habitual offender penalties so they would be triggered after five rather than three offenses, supporting the expansion of Comitis Crisis Center and opening up access to housing security deposit trusts.

A “Message to Drug Dealers” posted on Parella’s website also reads, “You are unwelcome here,” “Get your product off our streets and schools” and “I hunt you.”

Colorado’s general election is scheduled to take place Nov. 8.

— MAX LEVY, Sentinel Staff Writer

HOUSE DISTRICT 56

Rep. Bockenfeld gets re-election challenge from Democrat Conway

Longtime Arapahoe County lawmaker Rod Bockenfeld is running again to represent the house district that extends east of Aurora this fall, facing off against Democrat business owner Kathleen Conway.

In campaign materials and in their survey for The Sentinel, the two described different philosophies regarding growth, policing and health care.

Bockenfeld pushed back against the idea that the state would step in to regulate growth in communities with limited water resources, calling it a “complex local control issue.” He said the government could address road congestion by incentivizing businesses to stagger their work schedules, offer telecommuting jobs and promote carpooling.

“We have a congestion problem and not a capacity problem,” Bockenfeld wrote in his candidate survey. “The mere fact you get cars moving again instead of sitting idle in traffic improves air quality.”

Conway was supportive of the state barring growth in areas that lack water, bringing up looming water shortages. She said the state’s ability to accommodate new residents is limited by environmental factors and that homes build in wildfire zones where water is an issue are an example of the state ignoring the needs of current residents.

On the topic of law enforcement, Conway said she viewed Senate Bill 20-217 as a “step in the right direction” in terms of protecting both police and the public. The bill stripped police officers in the state of qualified immunity protections, required them to intervene and make a report when other officers use excessive force and mandated that more cops wear and use body-worn cameras.

She also said she would support police agencies being required to have some sort of independent oversight body that could review uses of force and deaths in custody, for example.

“Every police agency should have an oversight mechanism,” she said in her candidate survey. “Hospitals have reviews of anything thought to have gone wrong. Even newspapers have editors and proofreaders.”

Bockenfeld agreed with Conway on the topic of independent oversight groups but said he believed SB20-217 had made it harder for police to do their jobs, calling it a “knee-jerk” reaction to the death of George Floyd and saying it should be repealed.

Regarding the price of health care, Bockenfeld argued that the state should lobby the federal government to abolish Obamacare, which he claimed would drive down costs, and remove regulations on pharmaceutical companies.

“That is why pharmas are reluctant to pass some of those research and development costs onto other countries,” he wrote. “The cost of research and development of new drugs should be shared by worldwide consumers and not just the U.S.”

Conway blamed greed on the part of health insurance and pharmaceutical companies for the high cost of care.

She suggested that the state “force insurance companies to pass all rebated discounts they receive … on directly to the patient at the pharmacy” so savings aren’t instead “pocketed by the insurance company, hospitals and middlemen.”

— MAX LEVY, Sentinel Staff Writer

HOUSE DISTRICT 30

Personal rights focus of HD 30 race

Current state representative Dafna Michaelson Jenet is running against political newcomer Justin Brown to represent the redistricted House District 32, which will encompass much of Commerce City, Aurora and unincorporated Adams County.

Jenet is currently a state representative for House District 30. During her six years in the Legislature she has focused on issues including increasing access to mental and behavioral health services and improving services for foster youth and other young people. Jenet sits on the education, finance, legislative audit and Public Health Care & Human Services committees. Jenet was one of many sponsors of the Reproductive Health Equity Act, which enshrines Colorado’s current abortion protections into law. Following the May leak of the Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade, Jenet spoke publicly about an abortion she had when she was 40 after a 20-week ultrasound during her third pregnancy discovered that her baby had no heartbeat.

“The risks of not having the procedure involved not passing my baby and instead hemorrhaging and potentially dying, because I was already bleeding,” Jenet wrote in an op-ed in Newsweek. “So, having the procedure was necessary in order to maintain my life.”

On her campaign website, Jenet said that her future legislative priorities are bolstering the Adams County economy, supporting veterans, education and continuing to advocate for increased access for mental health care.

Her opponent, Republican candidate Justin Brown, did not respond to Sentinel inquiries but has put a primacy on energy independence online.

A Commerce City resident who works in the oil and gas industry, Brown’s campaign website states that protecting parental rights in education, improving the economy and lowering crime are his main priorities.

“I want to help with the pocket-book issues by lowering taxes and fighting inflation,” the website states. “As well as, unleashing our energy production which will boost the economy and help lower gas prices.”

Brown was the MC at a Log Cabin Republicans event in September and has been endorsed by the Colorado Oil & Gas Commission and the Colorado Hispanic Republicans. Jenet has been endorsed by Congressman Joe Neguse, Senator Michael Bennet and the Colorado Education Association.

— CARINA JULIG, Sentinel Staff Writer

SENATE DISTRICT 27

State Senate District 27 marked by drive for change from 2 directions

After representing Colorado’s 37th House District since 2018, Democrat and prominent gun safety advocate Tom Sullivan is now vying for a seat in the legislature’s other chamber with a campaign to represent Colorado’s 27th Senate District. His Republican challenger is political newcomer and businessman Tom Kim.

Previously represented by Chris Kolker, who won the seat for the Democratic Party, the district was redrawn during Colorado’s redistricting process, which placed Kolker in the 16th district.

Sullivan previously ran an unsuccessful campaign to represent the district under its old boundaries in 2016 before becoming elected to the House in 2018, losing to Republican Jack Tate. Now, he’s returning with several years of political experience under his belt.

A lawyer and business consultant, Kim has no previous electoral experience. His campaign website states that he is the grandson of immigrants from Korea and has been living in Colorado since the 1990s. In a video Kim says he is “saddened by what I’ve seen in Colorado over the past decade,” including rising crime, costs of living and parents “being denied a voice in their children’s education.”

A veteran and retired U.S. Postal Service worker, Sullivan became known as a gun safety activist after the death of his 27-year-old son Alex Sullivan in the 2012 Aurora theater shooting. In the legislature Sullivan has pushed for tougher gun safety measures, and was a sponsor of Colorado’s Extreme Risk Protection Order law, which went into effect in 2020. Also known as the “red flag” law, the law allows law enforcement or family to petition for someone’s firearms to be temporarily removed if they are credibly deemed to be a threat to themselves or others.

 Gun control is shaping up to be a salient topic in the election, with progressive organization Together Colorado criticizing Kim for his record on the issue. Kim has been endorsed by the NRA, according to its Colorado voter guide, while Sullivan has a “F” grade from the organization.

In response to a Sentinel Q&A, Kim said he opposed banning assault-style weapons and thought that addressing mental health would be a more effective way to curb violence in society. Sullivan, who noted that his son was killed by an assault-style weapon, said that they have “no place in our society” but are only a small part of the problem.

— CARINA JULIG, Sentinel Staff Writer

 

Arapahoe County Offices Vote Totals 2022

Candidate NameOfficePartyIncumbentVotes
Mark GottoDistrict 2 - commissionerRepublican17225
Jessical Campbell-SwansonDistrict 2 - commissionerDemocrat21917
Bob RothDistrict 4 - commissionerRepublican9729
Leslie SummeyDistrict 4 - commissionerDemocrat17513
Bob AndrewsAssessorRepublican65357
PK KaiserAssessorDemocratY93272
Caroline CornellClerkRepublican62135
Joan LopezClerkDemocratY101686
0
Ron BouchardCoronerRepublican59890
Kelly C. LearCoronerDemocratY96134
Kevin EdlingSheriffRepublican66800
Tyler BrownSheriffDemocratY92292
Marsha BerzinsTreasurerRepublican68178
Michael Roger WesterbergTreasurerDemocrat93906

ARAPAHOE COUNTY RACES

Arapahoe County Commissioner District 2

ArapCo District 2 candidates put up plans for growth

Jessica Campbell-Swanson and Mark Gotto are vying to represent Arapahoe County’s District 2 on the board of commissioners. Both have prior experience in politics but would be serving their first term on the board. Current representative, Republican Nancy Sharpe, is term-limited.

Republican candidate Gotto previously served on the Centennial city council for four years and has a business background. A progressive Democrat, Campbell-Swanson is currently chief of staff for state representative Iman Jodeh, an attorney and founder of a political campaign firm.

Currently Colorado’s third most populous county, Arapahoe County encompasses most of Aurora and Littleton, the cities of Englewood, Glenwood, Greenwood Village and Glendale and a number of other smaller cities and towns in the Denver metro area. Though its county seat is Littleton, Aurora is by far its most populous city.

As Campbell-Swanson noted in response to a Sentinel questionnaire, the county’s population is only expected to increase in the coming years. She said that growth is the county’s biggest challenge and must be addressed proactively instead of simply being resisted.

“We already have a housing crisis, lack of access to reliable public transportation, strife and violence in our communities, and poor air quality and limited water resources,” she said. “Growth will add pressure to these difficulties and if we don’t take proactive steps with the vision of a healthy, thriving, and sustainable Arapahoe County in mind, we will be in a world of hurt.”

Gotto’s campaign website states that his top priorities are curbing car theft and other crime, the transition to a new health department and managing federal infrastructure funding responsibly. In the questionnaire, he said that crime prevention and infrastructure investment are the county’s two biggest challenges.

“Our roads and potholes need to be fixed and maintained,” he said. “I will use my experience to help the Public Works department build a 10 year funding plan so our County’s quality of life is not impacted by driving on faulty roads.”

A self-identified fiscal conservative, Gotto’s website states that he “will manage waste and promise to fund all necessary resources important to the community.”

Gotto has been endorsed by Sharpe and Centennial Mayor Stephanie Piko. Campbell-Swanson has been endorsed by commissioners Carrie Warren-Gully, Nancy Jackson and Bill Holen. 

— Carina Julig, Sentinel Staff Writer 

 

Arapahoe County Commissioner District 4

Service and safety rise to top issues in ArapCo District 4 race 

Democrat Leslie Summey and Republican Bob Roth are the candidates running to represent Arapahoe County’s District 4 on the Board of County Commissioners. Both would be new to the seat, which is currently held by Democrat Nancy Jackson, who is term-limited.

A U.S. Navy veteran and small business owner originally from Colorado Springs, this would be Summey’s first elected position. Roth is a previous Aurora city council member, having served from 2011 to 2019. In 2020 he made an unsuccessful bid to represent Colorado’s 26th State Senate District, losing to Democratic incumbent Jeff Bridges. This is the first campaign for Summey, who eked out a primary win after at one point being exactly tied with opponent Regina Edmonson. 

Both candidates say that their previous life and work experience make them well-equipped for the job. Summey’s campaign website states that being a parent to an LGBTQ child and a child on the autism spectrum, along with being raised by a veteran father and a mother who worked in El Paso’s election division, informed her views on public service.

“It is central to not only my campaign, but my values that I represent families, veterans, women, and children–those who were born here in Arapahoe County to those newly arrived immigrants,” the website states. “The community must have a voice at the table where decisions are made.”

Roth’s campaign website states that his upbringing as the son of cattle ranchers and farmers and his decades of experience in construction have given him a strong work ethic and an understanding of fiscal responsibility that he has carried with him as an elected official.

Roth’s time on Aurora’s city council was marked by questions about a construction consulting business he founded, which some viewed as an ethical breach for being a conflict of interest. He told The Sentinel in 2018 that his business and his involvement in local government did not cross over.

His campaign website states that public safety, education, the economy and ensuring “that Arapahoe County is well run and efficient, serving the needs of all of its citizens” are his main priorities.

— Carina Julig, Sentinel Staff Writer 

Arapahoe County Clerk

Incumbent Joan Lopez faces Girl Scout leader for Arapahoe County Clerk and Recorder

In a bid for re-election, first-term Clerk and Recorder Joan Lopez, a Democrat, is facing Republican Caroline Cornell, a Republican who unsuccessfully ran for a state House seat in 2020.

Both candidates say the position, which includes running elections, should be based on trust from voters in the community.

“I’ve learned that when people don’t know how something works and aren’t getting answers, they become skeptical,” Cornell said in a candidate survey to the Sentinel.  “When they hear partisan rhetoric on top of that, there is bound to be mistrust. Rebuilding public confidence starts with elected officials choosing to turn down partisan rhetoric and work toward common ground.”

Likewise, Lopez, who won the seat in 2018 from her former boss, Republican Matt Crane, said, “trust comes from understanding” and that the clerk “should make sure the public is informed on how the process works.”

There are approximately 411,000 active voters across the county, which includes the majority of Aurora and swathes of Littleton, Centennial, Greenwood Village and small towns to the east, including Byers, Peoria and Deer Trail. 

Despite a wave of election conspiracy theories that started with the Trump campaign in 2020 and then trickled down to local elections across the country, including in Colorado, both candidates say they trust the outcomes of elections in Colorado. 

“Colorado has the most secure, safest election processes in the country. Arapahoe County has hosted other states, assisting them in improving their elections back home. All while winning three national awards for access, security and refuting dis-information. I will have 100% confidence in the results,” Lopez said in a candidate survey.

Cornell said she’d like to see the legislature take some steps to address signature verification and ballot harvesting, which is when a third party gathers and submits completed ballots. In Colorado, a voter can authorize another individual to return their ballot. State law currently dictates that an individual can collect up to 10 ballots to return.

“Improvements to signature verification audits and regulating ballot harvesting activities are reasonable next steps for the legislature,” she said. “…Enhancing audit practices will help restore confidence in the process.”

The clerk and recorder is also responsible for other county services, such as vehicle registrations, marriage licenses and preserving public documents. The main office of the department is located in Littleton, but branches for motor vehicle services exist across the county. There are also nine motor vehicle registration renewal kiosks available to residents. 

Cornell said she’d like to see more of those kiosks installed.

“Installing kiosks at additional grocery stores in underserved communities with extended business hours is a win-win,” she said. “Improving this service and increasing awareness of this option would help manage wait times as walk in services are reintroduced.”

— Kara Mason, Sentinel Managing Editor

Arapahoe County Assessor 

ArapCo assessor candidates focus on access

Colorado counties are responsible for a lot of aspects of daily life. Among them: appraising and recording all real and personal property within the jurisdiction. This year, incumbent PK Kaiser, a Democrat, faces Republican Bob Andrews, a real estate professional and former state House candidate, for the seat. 

Kaiser, who also formerly ran unsuccessfully for Aurora City Council, was elected in 2018. In the assessor’s office, he’s responsible for classifying and evaluating property, maintaining relevant public records and completing the annual Abstract of Assessment. 

While the job of the county assessor is one that deals with property, the office doesn’t set or collect taxes. The main job is to determine the value of property. 

Still, the two candidates have a clear idea of how they’d like to see the office run. 

“I am a strong believer in exceptional customer service, so much so that I taught college credit classes in customer service. Elected officials are servants of the public and need to be accessible,” Andrews said in a candidate survey. “I will have a walk-in office available to taxpayers. The position of County Assessor is a full-time job, and your County Assessor should report to work every day and be accessible to anyone in public at any time to discuss matters regarding their property. This is why this position is titled public servant.”

Kaiser said if elected to another term, his top priority would be to expand services to a county that encompasses 805 square miles and large urban centers and small towns. 

“We will keep working on the process improvements across the different sections of the assessor’s office,” he said. “The assessor office is more efficient and accessible than ever before. We will keep the open hire policy, career development & work flexibility for the staff. We will cooperate with other county assessors’ offices for mutual benefits.” 

Prior to the pandemic, the assessor’s office set up a temporary mobile office in the Heather Gardens retirement community in Aurora, where residents could submit appeals, protests, abatements and other applications. 

Kaiser said he’s currently working on plans to replicate that model in “remote areas” and to people who may not have internet access.

While not a highly political office that endures the same kinds of issues as state lawmakers or even county commissioners, Kaiser and Andrews each say it’s still important for the position to be elected. 

“I think it is important that the office for County Assessor be elected by the county citizens so they can be assured that the individual is competent, thorough, and accountable. Voting eliminates political nepotism and the ‘good old boy’ system,” Kaiser said. “With population increase in number and diversity more representation will bring more talent into politics.”

Andres said the position, however, shouldn’t be partisan. 

“Party affiliation should not be a variable when determining the value of a property,” he said.  “In fact, considering party affiliation when valuing would be a violation of my appraisal license and would lead to disciplinary actions by the Division of Regulatory Agencies… it is best that the Assessors Office is run by a Licensed Appraiser who is not appointed by the Commissioners (BOCC) since the BOCC control the budget.”  

— Kara Mason, Sentinel Managing Editor

 

Arapahoe County Treasurer 

Republican Marsha Berzins and Democrat Michael Westerberg duel over Arapahoe treasurer seat

Marsha Berzins and Michael Westerberg are facing off this fall over the future of the Arapahoe County treasurer job most recently held by Republican Sue Sandstrom.

Berzins, a small business owner who served on Aurora’s City Council for more than a decade and then ran for mayor, said her experience in the business world made her uniquely qualified to run the office, which is responsible for collecting and investing county funds.

“I know you cannot learn management skills only out of a book. It takes day-to-day, common-sense experience dealing with people,” Berzins wrote in her Sentinel survey. “I have that experience and leadership. I value all people and what they can each contribute. I have been a public servant since my teen years and look forward to many more years.”

Westerberg, a tax attorney, said past treasurers have gotten away with doing the “bare minimum” in office and that he hoped to implement new revenue-generating ideas for the county.

“I have management experience of junior personnel at nearly all my previous employers,” he wrote in his survey. “I do not intend to micromanage, but I do pride myself on my communication skills and collaboration. I have confidence I will be able to communicate a vision and direction to the Treasurer’s Office staff so they have a framework to work within.”

Berzins said on her campaign website that her priorities include fighting fraud, waste and abuse of our tax dollars if elected. Westerberg’s platform includes responsible investing and sharing information about county spending and programs with taxpayers.

When asked about the wisdom of investing county money in mortgage funds, both said the funds have historically been a safe investment, despite the subprime mortgage crisis 15 years ago. Berzins said the funds pose “virtually no risk to the investor” and Westerberg called them “a good, stable investment,” but said he would watch the housing market for signs of a downturn.

— MAX LEVY, Sentinel Staff Writer

Arapahoe County Sheriff 

Brown stands his ground in Arapahoe County sheriff’s race

Tyler Brown seemed poised to hold onto his job as Arapahoe County sheriff following the first release of election results Tuesday night, leading his Republican opponent, Kevin Edling, with around 56.5% of the vote.

Democrat Tyler Brown is seeking a second term as sheriff of Arapahoe County this fall, opposed by Republican Kevin Edling.

Priorities for Brown’s next term as the county’s top law enforcement officer would include expanding mental health resources in the Arapahoe County Detention Center, continuing the agency’s rollout of body-worn cameras, creating a diversion program for low-level offenders with the district attorney’s office and installing more license plate cameras around the county.

Brown wrote in his Sentinel survey that he wants to improve transparency within the agency by continuing the accreditation process through the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies.

“This opens up our agency to review on an annual basis and on-site reviews every four years to ensure the Arapahoe County Sheriff’s Office is not only participating in best business practices but displaying them on a daily basis,” he said.

Edling answered the same question by saying he wanted to install dashboard-mounted cameras in sheriff’s office vehicles and publish information about the office’s policies online.

Edling’s priorities as sheriff, according to his campaign website, include supporting homeless outreach programs, using proactive policing strategies to curb property crime and ensuring deputies are “patrolling the areas that have been identified by predictive crime modeling and common sense,” and recruiting and retaining more deputies.

“Also, the current Sheriff’s leadership team has just one person who is not white,” Edling wrote in his survey. “There are no Hispanic or Black leaders on the command staff today. That is simply not acceptable. We need the ACSO to be representative of the community we serve, and we currently are not.”

He wrote that he would make sure the pay and benefits offered by the office are competitive and that part-time positions could be offered to certified officers who recently retired or left the career to fill a staffing shortage and mentor younger officers. 

Brown said on his campaign website that, during his first term as sheriff, the agency’s retention rate was high, with less than 5% of public safety staff positions vacant.

— MAX LEVY, Sentinel Staff Writer

Arapahoe County Coroner 

Lear leads Bouchard in Arapahoe coroner race

Incumbent Arapahoe County Coroner Kelly Lear held a comfortable lead over Republican challenger Ron Bouchard following the first release of 2023 election results, claiming 59.5% of the vote to Bouchard’s 37.4%.

Kelly Lear, an 18-year veteran of the Arapahoe County Coroner’s Office, is seeking re-election this fall, opposed by Republican microscopist Ron Bouchard.

Bouchard did not return his Sentinel survey. His campaign website says he is running to bring greater transparency to the office. He said he wants to “elucidate the root cause of deaths associated with global COVID-19 pandemic” and investigate cases of “sudden adult death syndrome,” a diagnosis that vaccine skeptics have claimed without evidence is being used to hide the true nature of vaccine-related deaths.

Lear has promoted herself as the only physician and forensic pathologist on the ballot and said she is running to uphold her office’s high standard of work.

“I am seeking re-election in order to give the families that we serve the highest-quality medicolegal death investigation, something that happens only with medically informed leadership,” she wrote in her Sentinel survey.

“I believe that it is vital that a medical doctor be the person directing medical decisions and determining the cause and manner of death; families deserve to have this resource available to them when seeking answers to a tragic death.”

— MAX LEVY, Sentinel Staff Writer

 

 

Adams County Offices Vote Totals 2022

Candidate NameOfficePartyIncumbentVote Total
Sean ForestDistrict 3 - CommissionerRepublican53196
Emma PinterDistrict 3 - CommissionerDemocratY68086
Joseph DomenicoDistrict 4 - CommissionerRepublican51165
Steve O'DorisioDistrict 4 - CommissionerDemocratY68044
0
Karen HoopesClerkRepublican51882
Josh ZygielbaumClerkDemocratY68029
Stan MartinTreasurerRepublican56571
Alexander VillagranTreasurerDemocrat63503
Hieu Truong NguyenAssessorRepublican551034
Ken MussoAssessorDemocratY68744
Mike 'Mac' McIntoshSheriffRepublican57013
Gene ClapsSheriffDemocrat64428
Monica Broncucia-JordanCoronerDemocratY68991
David A. ShakleeCoronerRepublican51081

Adams County Races

Adams County Commissioner District 3

Pinter seeks  re-election in Adams County, facing veteran Sean Forest

Democratic incumbent Emma Pinter is running for a second term representing Adams County’s 2nd District on the Board of County Commissioners against Republican Sean Forest.

Pinter is an attorney, and before being elected at the county level served two terms on the Westminster city council. Forest is a business owner who works in project management and has been on a number of local boards, including the Adams County Planning Commission.

Along with much of the Denver metro area and surrounding environments, Adams County has seen significant growth over the past decade, with the county as a whole now home to over half a million people. That fact is top of mind for Forest, who said that managing growth will be Adams County’s biggest challenge going forward.

“The state demography office forecasts Adams County will be the 3rd largest county after Denver and El Paso,” Forest said in response to a Sentinel questionnaire. “Therefore, Adams County needs to plan to accommodate that growth and the needs that come with it, such as housing, water, energy, affordability, recreation, natural space, and business development.”

For her part, Pinter said that strengthening the local economy, creating more affordable housing and protecting what she called the “Colorado way of life” — including a healthy natural environment and access to reproductive health.

Pinter has been endorsed by county commissioners Steve O’Dorisio, Lynn Baca and Eva Henry, along with a number of other local Democratic politicians. Forest has been endorsed by Federal Heights Mayor Linda Montoya, Brighton Mayor Greg Mills, the Colorado Oil & Gas Commission and two Fraternal Order of Police lodges.

— Carina Julig, Sentinel Staff Writer

Adams County Commissioner District 4

Adams County District 4 candidates aim to improve livability

Democrat Steve O’Dorisio and Republican Joseph Domenico are competing in the race to represent Adams County’s 4th District on the Board of Commissioners. 

First elected to the board in 2014, O’Dorisio is the incumbent and is running for a third term on the five-person board. He and Domenico both ran unopposed in their primaries.

O’Dorisio is a former deputy district attorney in the 17th Judicial District Attorney’s Office, which serves Adams and Broomfield counties. Domenico currently works as a maintenance engineer and was a longtime employee of King Soopers, according to his campaign website.

O’Dorisio has received support from across the aisle in his bid for a final term, including endorsements from former Aurora Mayor Bob LeGare and Becky Hogan, wife of late former Aurora Mayor Steve Hogan.

In response to a Sentinel questionnaire, O’Dorisio said that his top priorities for the county include investing in crime fighting and prevention, improving roads and other transportation infrastructure and making housing more affordable for working families.

On his campaign website he has touted his work during his first two terms on increasing the county’s open space, providing more funding for the DA’s Office and Sheriff’s Department and increasing the amount of infrastructure funding the county has for its roads and bridges.

Domenico declined to complete the Sentinel’s questionnaire, directing voters instead to his campaign website. 

 “Their (sic) is a lot of information on it and what I stand for,” he said in an email.

Domenico’s website states that his key priorities include lifting the moratorium on fracking in Adams County and renegotiating zoning regulations to be more favorable to gas and oil companies and other businesses.

— Carina Julig, Sentinel Staff Writer

Adams County Clerk and Recorder

Adams County clerk faces challenge from Republican Karen Hoopes

Four years after flipping the Adams County Clerk and Recorder seat, Democrat Josh Zygielbaum is vying for re-election. This time, he faces Republican candidate Karen Hoopes, a former Mapleton Board of Education member,  for the seat. 

Zygielbaum and other election officials across the country also face steeper challenges than they did four years ago. Mis- and dis-information stepped prominently into the spotlight ahead of the 2020 presidential election results, when Donald Trump falsely claimed the voting process was rigged. The conspiracy theory, which has been debunked over and over again, has taken hold in some coservative circles, and in the wake of the Jan. 6 insurrection came local threats of violence and acts of intimidation. 

Earlier this year, Zygielbaum, a former Marine, told ABC News that he wears a bulletproof vest to the office due to threatening messages. 

“I think January 6 was a good reminder that it can very easily go beyond just words,” Zygielbaum told Denver7 in May. “You repeat a lie (and) enough people start to believe it, and I think that there is probably a coordinated effort at the very top, and others just eventually felt that it was truth and began to follow.”

Distrust is something he says he battles on an ongoing basis. 

“I encourage anyone who doubts our processes to come for a tour, to become an election worker, or an election watcher,” he told the Sentinel in a candidate survey. “I encourage those who believe in the conspiracies to become a part of the elections process to gain an understanding for how it all actually works.”

Hoopes proposes more “transparency” measures to engage citizens. She said as clerk she would “provide online public access to scanned ballot images immediately following an election to increase transparency and improve voter confidence” and add high resolution cameras to ballot drop boxes across the county. Those videos could then be monitored by citizens through a livestream feed on the clerk’s website. 

Hoopes said she will “trust but verify” the 2022 election results. 

“Regarding my acceptance of the outcome of the election, ask me again on Nov. 9,” she said. 

Beyond elections, the county clerk and recorder is responsible for a bevy of other actions, such as motor vehicle registration, granting marriage licenses and recording documents. 

With those services, Zygielbaum said he wants to continue improving access. He touts an office that his office opened dedicated to the business community and improving online access to payments. 

“I will continue along this path, expanding services strategically in order to serve our community in the most efficient and cost-effective manner possible,” he said. 

Hoopes’ said upon being elected, she would “gain a better understanding of our customer’s needs, likes, and dislikes through customer opinion surveys and focus groups.”

— Kara Mason, Sentinel Managing Editor

 

Adams County Treasurer 

After a year of turbulence, 2 candidates seek to stabilize Adams County Treasurer’s Office

A year ago, Adams County sued its own elected county treasurer, alleging Lisa Culpepper mismanaged and did not reconcile county bank accounts — to the tune of $200 million. Now, two new candidates are seeking to claim the seat. 

Republican Stan Martin is a familiar face in Adams County. He was the county clerk and recorder before losing reelection to Josh Zygielbaum in 2018. His challenger is Democrat Alexander Villagran. Culpepper, a Democrat, did not earn enough signatures to get on the primary ballot earlier this year. 

The duo are running to essentially be the county’s banker, a position both said they don’t take lightly. The county treasurer’s office is responsible for collecting and investing county funds. The treasurer is tasked with property taxes and distributing the revenue to the county, its municipalities and to schools.

“County treasurers have an enormous responsibility overseeing the taxpayer funds. This is the ‘peoples’ money, not the Treasurers’ money,” Martin said in a candidate survey. He said he would take a conservative approach to county finances, not risking public dollars on a volatile cryptocurrency market, but rather in “safe, secure savings accounts.”

Villagran said he believed that “no more than 1% of (the) portfolio should be invested in a bitcoin retirement county fund.” 

The treasurer is also responsible for submitting monthly reports on county finances to county commissioners. Culpepper reportedly did not submit such reports in 2019, 2021 and from January 2021 to July 2021. 

“We are unified as a Board that legal action is required to ensure this independently elected office is transparent in the accounting of county taxpayer dollars,” commissioners said in a statement to the press last October. “To date the Treasurer has not provided required reports and has not provided adequate information requested to allow for a standard audit of the office. The limited information the Board has been able to gather indicates the Treasurer is not timely or accurate in performing statutory duties, which could negatively impact the county’s bond rating and financial outlook.”

Despite turbulence in the office, Martin said the treasurer should be an elected partisan office. 

“I firmly believe Adams County citizens should have the final say in who they want to represent, not some other partisan elected officials,” Martin said. 

Villagran said his management experience is what will give him an edge in the office. 

“I possess over eight years managerial experience in the public sector,” he wrote in a candidate survey. “The progression: I successfully lead a staff of 10, 15 and then 42 clerical and professional individuals.” 

Prior to being the Adams County clerk, Martin spent 21 years operating his own general contracting business. Before that, he worked in corporate management.

— Kara Mason, Sentinel Managing Editor

 

Adams County Assessor 

Adams County Assessor Ken Musso faces Republican Hieu Nguyen in re-election bid

Ken Musso will run for a second term as Adams County assessor this fall, facing assessor’s office employee and Republican nominee Hieu Nguyen.

The assessor’s office is responsible for listing and valuing properties in Adams County for tax purposes. Nguyen said on her campaign website that she wants to make the office more accessible by opening satellite offices, improving the system for members of the public to submit paperwork online and communicating more with county residents.

“The largest problem with the current assessor’s office is their lack of community involvement,” Hieu’s website reads. “I want to keep the public informed of all the important dates and events that would impact the citizens of Adams County, such as when to apply for senior exemptions, or when to apply for appeals so our citizens can keep more of their hard-earned money.”

Musso wrote in his Sentinel survey that the office had been able to make more of its processes and information available online and that in his next term he too wanted to open satellite offices.

He said his top priority if elected would be to “execute the duties of the assessor’s office to the best of my abilities.”

“Our main goal is to produce fair valuations and offer good customer service with complete transparency for the people of Adams County,” Musso wrote.

— Max Levy,  Sentinel Staff Writer

Adams County Sheriff 

Adams County sheriff’s race pits two former deputies against each other

Former Adams County sheriff Mike McIntosh and former Adams County Jail division chief Gene Claps will go head-to-head this fall in the race to become the county’s next top cop.

Democrat Rick Reigenborn defeated McIntosh and secured the sheriff’s post in 2018 by a margin of about 5%. But Reigenborn’s tenure got off to a controversial start with the ouster of a number of senior officers — including Claps — during his second day in office over perceived loyalty to McIntosh.

The office has also since faced a criminal investigation by state police into record-keeping discrepancies in the training division, among other controversies. In June, Claps usurped his former boss during their party’s primary election.

Claps’ priorities if elected include restoring the office’s partnership with Community Reach and other mental health care resources in Adams County, engaging in proactive enforcement around high-crime areas and improving relationships with other agencies.

“I plan to continue to address and work with other Adams County stakeholders in reducing recidivism and other public issues like homelessness and drug abuse which are normally linked to some type of mental health concerns,” Claps wrote in his Sentinel survey.

“While working with mental health professionals and providing programs, education, and training to our inmate population, we will assist them in job searches, housing, transportation and other life skills for their success so they can provide for themself and their families.”

To help attract deputies to the office, Claps said he would work with commissioners and other county leaders to make sure pay and incentives are comparable with other Front Range agencies. 

McIntosh said that he plans to encourage leadership within the ranks of the sheriff’s office and improve transparency with the creation of community groups that will be able to share their concerns with deputies.

“Over the last four years, the leadership failures of the administration have greatly tarnished the reputation and ‘brand’ of the sheriff’s office,” he said. “This must change in order to make Adams County a safer, more enjoyable place for our residents to live.”

McIntosh said he would combat attrition by restoring a “strong, quality leadership team” and said the office achieved a single-digit attrition rate during his tenure as sheriff.

He also said he hopes to restart mental health programs at the county’s jail that had been discontinued by Reigenborn that had also helped inmates reintegrate into the community.

— Max Levy,  Sentinel Staff Writer

 

2022 Ballot Questions

Ballot Questions Vote Totals 2022

Statewide Ballot QuestionYes or NoArapahoe CountyDouglas CountyAdams CountyStatewide
Amendment D- 23rd JDYes107548106336736331145233
Amendment D- 23rd JDNo475475636337332551081
Amendment E- Gold Star ExemptionsYes1427941550691025881593069
Amendment E- Gold Star ExemptionsNo191471994314021218219
Amendment F-Charitable Gaming ChangesYes644076335347928677276
Amendment F-Charitable Gaming ChangesNo91573103623654171056863
Prop FF: Free school lunchesYes9397678977690031011114
Prop FF: Free school lunchesNo693899786049291823714
Prop GG: Add Tax Information Table to Petitions and BallotsYes112901118709849721263902
Prop GG: Add Tax Information Table to Petitions and BallotsNo467595301631241520145
Prop.121: State Income Tax Rate ReductionYes104357126148827571194817
Prop.121: State Income Tax Rate ReductionNo573474984837898628610
Prop 122: Access to Natural Psychedelic SubstancesYes836767769565494927292
Prop 122: Access to Natural Psychedelic SubstancesNo782719658654551890014
Prop 123: Dedicate Revenue for Affordable Housing ProgramsYes885867183663392920490
Prop.123: Dedicate Revenue for Affordable Housing ProgramsNo7391810252756828896525
Prop 124: Increase Allowable Liquor Store LocationsYes674377672352548680241
Prop 124: Increase Allowable Liquor Store LocationsNo9465097767665871130008
Prop.125: Allow Grocery and Convenience Stores to Sell WineYes827859554763950910994
Prop.125: Allow Grocery and Convenience Stores to Sell WineNo804248017156736917390
Prop 126: Third-Party Delivery of Alcohol BeveragesYes797528872062375862358
Prop 126: Third-Party Delivery of Alcohol Beveragesno829138688758167960779
Aurora 3A- Candidates with felony recordsYes2642958023800
Aurora 3A- Candidates with felony recordsNo40016169925540

 

 

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FactsOverFeelings
FactsOverFeelings
2 months ago

Can we just ship everyone in Douglas County off to Texas or Florida?