Aurora Police Chief candidate David Franklin, right, is interviewed by Gianina Horton, left, Aspen Chin, center left, and Reid Hettich, center, in the Channel 8 studio, Sept. 27, 2022, during a multi-day circuit of interviews and meet and greets with community members and members of the City Council.
Photo by PHILIP B. POSTON/Sentinel Colorado

The City of Aurora announced three, and later two, finalists last week for the job of leading the Aurora Police Department — a public safety agency struggling to regain the community’s trust while hanging on to officers and cracking down on car theft and other crimes.

At the end of the months-long selection process, Aurorans from across the political spectrum also aired their frustration with a process that they described as opaque and rushed, with lagging attempts to get the input of Black and brown residents and community leaders.

It’s been a long journey to Sept. 27, where the city’s two police chief finalists were introduced to the public.

Aurora police attracted unwanted international attention for the past few years after the death of Elijah McClain, an incident involving an officer passed out drunk inside of his police cruiser, young Black girls being forced face down onto hot pavement during a botched traffic stop and the forced rehiring of a veteran officer who referred to Black crime witnesses as “porch monkeys.”

Aurora Police Chief Vanessa Wilson takes questions from reporters at a press conference July 27, 2021 at Aurora city hall. Wilson pressed for criminal charges to be field against two APD officers after a man accused of trespassing was strangled and pistol-whipped. PHOTO BY PHILLIP B. POSTON/Sentinel Colorado

Ultimately, Vanessa Wilson was elevated to chief and made it a priority for the department to atone for past mistakes and commit to firing cops deemed rogue. Not long into her tenure, Aurora and the state attorney general entered into a consent decree, spelling out a bevy of police reform mandates.

Wilson, was fired in April over those police reforms and ensuring conflict within the department and on the City Council. When asked about Wilson’s firing, City Manager Jim Twombly alleged leadership problems in the department but did not say what Wilson had done specifically to lose her job. Former chief Dan Oates was tapped as interim chief shortly after.

Former Aurora Police Chief Vanessa Wilson at a rally supporting her after her ouster as chief last week. Philip B. Poston/Sentinel Colorado

Three possible replacements for Wilson were announced Sept. 21, though the field abruptly narrowed to two candidates the same day when the city said Scott Booth of Danville, Virginia had withdrawn following the announcement.

Booth has served as chief of Danville’s Police Department since 2018, during which time the career law enforcement officer won awards from Radford University and Virginia Commonwealth University for his community policing programs and leadership.

Following Booth’s withdrawal, he told reporter John Crane of the Danville Register & Bee that the Aurora job was “a very interesting opportunity in a great community that offered a lot of opportunities and challenges,” but that he ultimately wanted to stay in Danville.

Aurora Police Chief candidate Scott Ebner speaks with Aurora community members, Sept 27, 2022, in the lobby of city hall during a meet and greet opportunity with the two remaining candidates for the position.
Photo by PHILIP B. POSTON/Sentinel Colorado

The remaining finalists, who were selected by a panel of senior city officials from a pool of candidates that the city recruited with the help of California-based consultancy Public Sector Search & Consulting, include:

  • Scott Ebner, a retired lieutenant colonel and deputy superintendent of administration for New Jersey State Police, and
  • David Franklin, chief of staff of the Albuquerque, New Mexico police department.

 Ebner is a retired lieutenant colonel and deputy superintendent of administration for New Jersey State Police. 

He has applied for at least two other police chief roles this year. In February, he was named one of five finalists for the role of police chief in the town of Prescott Valley, Arizona. He lost out on the role to former Loveland Police Chief Bob Ticer. In May he was named as one of four candidates for Honolulu police chief, but was not ultimately selected.

According to information released by the city of Aurora, Ebner was with the New Jersey State Police for 27 years, and he previously worked for the Cape Coral Police Department in Florida. He graduated from the FBI National Academy and has a master’s degree in human resource management.

Reporting from the Prescott eNews said that before retirement Ebner’s duties included overseeing more than 300 employees and running the state police’s training academy. According to the paper, “Ebner said he wants to continue his public safety career as a chief of police with a progressive agency that is committed to community engagement and incorporates the best practices in the field.”

Little public information is available about his tenure. In 1998, a New York Times article details an incident where a government official who was in a car he pulled over for a traffic stop due to alleged erratic driving accused him of racial profiling. 

Essex County prosecutor Patricia Hurt, a Black woman, filed a complaint against Ebner regarding the incident. According to the Times, Hurt was a passenger in a car being driven by investigator Lescia Rosa, a Hispanic woman who worked in the prosecutor’s office. According to the Times, multiple people had reported the car for erratic driving and Rosa was given a speeding ticket.

Due to Hurt’s complaint, the State Police conducted an investigation. At press time, a Sentinel records request to the agency is pending.

The other finalist, Franklin, is a U.S. Marine Corps veteran and current chief of staff for the Albuquerque Police Department. A 2021 article in the Albuquerque Journal described his duties at the time he was hired as overseeing special projects, building and planning, fiscal, human resources and staffing, as well as working with the city council.

Aurora Police Chief candidate David Franklin speaks with Aurora community members, Sept 27, 2022, in the lobby of city hall during a meet and greet opportunity with the two remaining candidates for the position.
Photo by PHILIP B. POSTON/Sentinel Colorado

He served in the Texas Department of Public Safety for about 25 years, starting out as a trooper and sergeant in 1993 and departing as an executive commander and captain in 2018, according to a profile published on the City of Aurora’s website.

He also served as assistant chief of the University of Texas at Arlington Police Department for a year in 2019. Franklin also graduated from the FBI National Academy and holds a master’s degree focusing on homeland security issues, according to his city bio.

After Booth’s withdrawal, city spokesman Ryan Luby wrote in an email that the city “will be connecting with our recruiting firm for further insight.”

“At this moment, the city will proceed with the two remaining finalists but may approach some of the original semi-finalists for reconsideration,” Luby wrote on Sept. 21. “We will provide more details when and if that occurs.”

Luby wrote Tuesday that Ebner and Franklin were the city’s only two finalists and that the city was “moving forward with both as scheduled.”

Public Sector Search & Consulting was said to have conducted a nationwide search for candidates, sharing the opening with organizations like the Colorado Association of Chiefs of Police, Police Executive Research Forum, Hispanic American Police Command Officers Association, International Association of Chiefs of Police, National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives and the National Association of Women Law Enforcement Executives.

Luby wrote that seven of the 21 applicants were women or people of color — all three finalists were men. When asked if the three were, in fact, white, Luby replied that “the city does not ask a candidate to provide their national origin, race, color, religion, disability, sex, and familial status,” but said statistics were collected by PSSC.

“Hiring decisions based on these protected classes is illegal,” he said. “As for the finalists, city management chose the most qualified finalists of the candidates who actually applied.”

Luby wrote that all applicants came from outside of APD. Semi-finalists and finalists were chosen by a panel consisting of Oates, City Manager Jim Twombly and deputy city managers Jason Batchelor, Laura Perry and Roberto Venegas, with the help of PCCS.

Luby said nine applicants were chosen for semi-finalist interviews, one of whom was a woman, who withdrew, and another was a person of color, who did not advance.

Aurora Police Chief candidate Scott Ebner, right, is interviewed by Gianina Horton, left, Aspen Chin, center left, and Reid Hettich, center, in the Channel 8 studio, Sept. 27, 2022, during a multi-day circuit of interviews and meet and greets with community members and members of the City Council.
Photo by PHILIP B. POSTON/Sentinel Colorado

Close look at the final two

The interview process continued for Ebner and Franklin this week, as they met officers, toured police facilities, answered questions posed by the public in recorded interviews and participated in a meet and greet with residents. The city also opened its online Engage Aurora portal to solicit feedback from the public on the finalists and their interviews.

In their Sept. 27 taped interviews, the two fielded questions about their vision for the department, accomplishing the reforms included in the city’s consent decree with the Colorado Attorney General’s Office, improving morale, tackling crime and more.

When asked what made him the most qualified candidate for the job, Ebner talked about his commitment to public service as well as his experience working with the New Jersey State Police while that agency was managing its own federal consent decree, which addressed the problem of racial profiling during traffic stops. Ebner said the agency had “really flourished” in the aftermath of the decree. 

“Throughout my career, I’ve always put the public before myself,” he said. “To this day, I believe to my heart that law enforcement is the most noble profession there is, because we’re willing to put ourselves in harm’s way to protect someone we don’t even know, just like the military.”

Franklin talked about his experience in the Albuquerque Police Department, also, which has been operating under a settlement agreement with the federal government concerning officers’ use of force since 2014.

He said he wanted to change the culture of Aurora police through community outreach and by inviting community members in to share their experiences with police. He also said his experience investigating organized crime would help police undertake more surgical enforcement actions and reduce crime while avoiding the perception of overpolicing.

“​​One of the things that you’ve got to bring to this particular agency at this time is change,” Franklin said. “The Aurora Police Department will be a constitutional, relationship-based policing organization.”

Both said they wanted greater input in the hiring process than what the current structure leaving hiring decisions up to the Civil Service Commission allows. Franklin said he thought the department should focus on retention as its “stopgap,” while not sweating the departure of problem officers.

Aurora Police Chief candidate David Franklin, right, is interviewed by Gianina Horton, left, Aspen Chin, center left, and Reid Hettich, center, in the Channel 8 studio, Sept. 27, 2022, during a multi-day circuit of interviews and meet and greets with community members and members of the City Council.
Photo by PHILIP B. POSTON/Sentinel Colorado

“We’ve got to retain those officers that are good officers. We’ve got to let those officers that ain’t so good, that just want to leave because they don’t want to change, we’ve got to let them go, and we can’t worry about them,” Franklin said. “Sometimes, you know, you’ve just got to fire people.”

Ebner said the department should promote opportunities for professional development when recruiting new officers and said he would challenge officers to promote the department and welcome interested candidates to apply on its behalf.

“I’m going to challenge every one of them to make sure that they supply an individual, a name that we can use to hopefully … become an officer,” he said. “It’s easy for people to sit back and say, ‘Well, you’re not hiring diverse candidates.’ I would challenge them (and ask), ‘Have you recommended any diverse candidates to us?’”

When asked about his approach to crime reduction, Ebner said he believed it was important for police to build trust within the community, including by ensuring a diverse workforce, and invest in technology

“The most important part of police work is the prevention of crime,” Ebner said. “How do you do that? You have to work with the community. The community has to know that they can come to you and feel safe … and not feel like they’re going to be investigated when they’re the ones reporting (a crime).”

Franklin stressed the importance of intelligence gathering and determining the “drivers,” “facilitators” and “anchors” of crime, as well as working with other city departments to make sure environmental features like dead streetlights aren’t contributing to crime.

The two also described their plans for reforming police along the lines of the city’s consent decree. Franklin said he would like to see the department improve its computer-aided dispatch technology to make it easier for officers to document details of stops and make sure there are enough staffers to evaluate uses of force by officers.

He also said he would like to see the department review its use of force policies and make sure they align not only with state law but also national best practices established by organizations such as the Police Executive Research Forum and International Association of Chiefs of Police.

“Bring me those people that are much smarter than me and just let me facilitate them getting us the best practices (and) best ideas,” Franklin said. “What we really need to do is change the ideology that asks what works for Aurora. No. What about best practices nationwide?”

Ebner said he wanted to make sure Aurora police have an effective way of tracking the demographic data of drivers who they stop and that the data is compared with those of other officers operating in their same area.

“If for some reason I’m stopping a certain person of a certain demographic at a higher ratio than you, then we’re going to look at my videos, we’re going to look at my stop data, we’re going to look at my arrests, and we’re going to see why,” he said.

Ebner said he was committed to staying with the city for seven to 10 years, to see it through the implementation of its consent decree.

“It’s a cultural change in the beginning,” he said. “It’s not easy. It’s difficult.”

Community activist Lindsay Minter addresses the press regarding the selection process of the new police chief, Sept. 27, 2022, outside of Aurora City Hall. The now disbanded Community Police Task Force was not a part of the selection process.
Photo by PHILIP B. POSTON/Sentinel Colorado

Community dissent

Not everyone was encouraged by the city’s choice of finalists or the process by which they were chosen, including many of Aurora’s most high-profile residents of color, who said that they were shut out of the decision-making process.

“This is a missed opportunity to diversify the Aurora Police Department top down,” Qusair Mohamedbahi, lawyer for Elijah McClain’s mother Sheneen McClain, said of the selection.

Thomas Mayes, the president of the Denver Ministerial Alliance, who since 1990 has helped mediate conversations between the Aurora Police Department and residents, said he rejected an offer from the city to interview the finalists, who were hand-picked by senior city officials.

By only reaching out to Black residents for input after the candidate pool had been narrowed down to three finalists, Mayes said the city limited their role to rubber-stamping the choices of the interview panel.

“That’s the role of a token, and I’m not going to be there just because they want someone Black there. I’ll be there if I feel like I can make a difference,” Mayes said. “It’s the same thing over and over again, and I’m at my wits’ end to figure out where we go from here. This, to me, was a slap in the face.”

Mayes said that he had been told that several candidates of color had dropped out of the selection process, and wondered if that would still have happened if leaders of color had been involved in the process since the beginning.

State Sen. Rhonda Fields shares Mayes’ concerns. She pointed out that community members were given only a few days to submit questions before the recorded interviews on Sept. 27.

“Around 40% of the people who live in Aurora happen to be Black and brown, and no one reached out to them to get a sense of what they’re looking for in a police chief,” Fields said. “I am extremely troubled and disappointed in this whole entire process.”

She said she worries that by “rushing” the process, the city is dooming itself to hire another police chief who will remain in office for only a year or two before leaving.

Both questioned whether the process needed to be paused or at least slowed down so the city can get more feedback on candidates considered for the job.

Pastor Thomas Mayes addresses the press regarding the selection process of the new police chief, Sept. 27, 2022, outside of Aurora City Hall. The now disbanded Community Police Task Force was not a part of the selection process.
Photo by PHILIP B. POSTON/Sentinel Colorado

State Rep. Janet Buckner said that over the summer, she had been involved in a series of community conversations between community leaders of color and interim police chief Dan Oates and others in APD about how to rebuild trust in the department. She was told the meetings were confidential.

“Now I’m wondering, were they confidential because we were not being included?” Buckmer speculated to the Sentinel on Tuesday. She said she found out about the candidates when she was watching the news on TV.

“I stopped what it was doing and rewound because I was in disbelief,” she said.

To Buckner’s knowledge, nobody who was involved in the discussions over the summer had been invited to participate in the selection process, an omission she said made her feel hurt and disrespected.

“For none of the Black community leaders to be involved in this process is shameful,” she said.

She echoed a common theme among Black Aurorans the Sentinel spoke with — anger that they were being asked to sign on to the city’s decision without truly being included in the process. 

“This was not done with thoughtfulness, and it was not done with respect, yet they want our support,” Buckner said. She declined to attend the meet-and-greet segment for the public on Sept. 27.

Luby later said the process used to select the three finalists was the same process used to select Wilson and other chiefs, and that the city “gave strong direction to the city’s recruiting firm to seek out and encourage police chief applications from a wide, diverse pool of qualified candidates.”

“As we have previously stated, the city’s management team chose the most qualified finalists out of the candidates who actually applied with attention given to ensuring candidates meet the city of Aurora’s needs,” he said.

Even some City Council members slammed the selection process, with Danielle Jurinsky saying in a Sept. 22 Twitter post that she felt “great sadness” for the department.

“The recruiting efforts for a new Chief were abysmal at best,” she wrote, though she did not elaborate on why she thought the search was lacking. “To the officers, please know that I will not accept this quietly. The department deserves better, Aurora deserves better. Jim Twombly, DO BETTER!”

At a Tuesday evening press conference outside the Aurora Municipal Center, Mayes and a number of other former members of the Aurora Police Oversight Committee gathered to ask city leadership to restart the selection process and to reinstate the committee.

“We will pursue every facet available to us in order to reinstate the community’s voice in every process,” said longtime local activist and former city council candidate Candice Bailey.

Pastor Thomas Mayes addresses the press regarding the selection process of the new police chief, Sept. 27, 2022, outside of Aurora City Hall. The now disbanded Community Police Task Force was not a part of the selection process.
Photo by PHILIP B. POSTON/Sentinel Colorado

One by one, the Oversight Committee members evinced a sense of frustration about their present circumstances. After years of protests and multiple investigations, they were once again gathered at city hall to demand that the Aurora Police Department live up to its promises of change.

“No community has been more negatively affected by the Aurora Police Department than the African-American community,” Mayes said — and yet it was not at the table during this pivotal decision.

The speakers were not forgetful of the fact that they were gathered at the same place where the largest protests demanding justice for Elijah McClain’s death in 2020 took place. Bailey at one point gestured to the municipal center’s windows, which were boarded up for about two years after being damaged during the protests.

“It’s really important to keep in perspective that this is the department that killed Elijah McClain,” said Joshua Jackson, State Criminal Justice Committee Chair of the Rocky Mountain NAACP. “This is a department that has blood on its hands already.”

— Staff Writer Carina Julig contributed to this story

 

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Hypocrisy Monitor
Hypocrisy Monitor
2 months ago

Six days ago, I said this would be the exact response of Aurora’s blacktivists when they learned the skin color of the finalists. They are so predictable it is almost boring.

https://sentinelcolorado.com/news/metro/aurora-announces-3-police-chief-finalists-invites-public-input/

Joe Felice
Joe Felice
2 months ago

Looking out for one’s interests is “boring.” Got it.

Doug
Doug
2 months ago

Luby wrote that seven of the 21 applicants were women or people of color — all three finalists were men. Pretty obvious.

Publius
Publius
2 months ago
Reply to  Doug

That is not remotely obvious to me.

I take heed that Aurora is currently under a consent decree. The consent decree monitor has, and will certainly continue to monitor this selection process. It there were anything untoward about the process we would have heard about it from the consent decree monitor. No, all we have here is a small statidtical anomoly and people’s preconcieved biases, often based on incomplete and misunderstiood or misreported information. I do appreciate you, and others, being diligent on the matter. I would hope with that diligence comes an open mind. Having read you previously I believe that to be more likely than not.

Hypocrisy Monitor
Hypocrisy Monitor
2 months ago
Reply to  Doug

Considering who applies to become police officers, these proportions don’t seem off at all. I have questions: How many women apply to become officers in the first place? How many POCs are trying to become officers? How many are qualified and eligible? How many are not poisoned by a cultural aversion to law enforcement?

It’s astounding that the city has found as many as they have already among the police and fire chiefs (Metz, Gray, Wilson–all of whom are one of those as mentioned earlier “underrepresented classes”).

You have to fish where the fish are.

K. Smith
K. Smith
2 months ago

Sit this one, and all subsequent ones, out.

Hypocrisy Monitor
Hypocrisy Monitor
2 months ago
Reply to  K. Smith

No, thank you.

GeneD
2 months ago
Reply to  K. Smith

Nope. How can you evaluate where you stand unless you’ve heard dissenting voices?

K. Smith
K. Smith
2 months ago

I feel the same about you.

Hypocrisy Monitor
Hypocrisy Monitor
2 months ago
Reply to  K. Smith

And yet, I’ve not asked you to sit down. I guess you are not a fan of freedom of speech.

J Walter
J Walter
2 months ago

So…he wants to know about our interactions with police? We have NONE! Unless you count when they come to tow away dumped, stolen cars from our cul de sac. The Havana Speedway goes on nearly every night, with zero intervention, two streets away. Windows of businesses continue their nightly bullet holes. We have absolutely no police down here in the largely white part of Aurora, where we don’t commit crimes, but are certainly victims. Going North to Stanley Marketplace or Stapleton(won’t call it CP after they vetoed names of two black aerospace contributors), the streets are full of patrol cars.
Draw your own conclusions.

Doug
Doug
2 months ago
Reply to  J Walter

It’s obvious where you stand

Hypocrisy Monitor
Hypocrisy Monitor
2 months ago
Reply to  Doug

You really should stop saying everything is “obvious.” It’s not.

Other than that you are a sad man with a dogmatic and blind commitment to the progressive/socialist roadmap.

GeneD
2 months ago

Yow! Talk about rubber and glue. Ad hominin attacks usually show that you have no substance to your opinion.

Hypocrisy Monitor
Hypocrisy Monitor
2 months ago
Reply to  GeneD

Gene, Gene, Gene, an ad hominem attack to condemn an alleged ad hominem attack? I admire your penchant for irony. That said, please point to specifics of my assessment so we can debate.

That police officers are overwhelmingly male and that few women enter the field? Or that inner city black culture vilifies public safety officers and therefore feeds small numbers into an application? Or that too many POCs are ineligible by law or unable to pass suitability screening? I realize the race card is a popular play, but an honest conversation would better suit our public needs.

Sandy
2 months ago
Reply to  J Walter

Well I live in Northwest Aurora and we sure don’t see them here. Not sure what you’re talking about.

Debra MacKillop
Debra MacKillop
2 months ago

Aurora citizens do not trust APD or the process of hiring a new police chief, nor do we trust the firing of the last chief. What we do know for sure is that APD has obstructed and opposed the necessary reforms ordered for the police department after an outside independent review of the APD. Expand the diversity of this process, and include diverse local groups and Aurora agencies in the vetting. Aurora deserves better than this.

Don
Don
2 months ago

Please explain how someone’s skin color provides them an advantage in determining who can do a job better. Or how someone’s skin color enables them to do a job better.

Doug
Doug
2 months ago
Reply to  Don

It doesn’t. But when all three finalists are white men it does illuminate an advantage.

Publius
Publius
2 months ago
Reply to  Doug

The last two Chiefs were a Black male and a lesbian, white, female. Aurora has clearly been willing to consider candidates other than white males. The Fire Chief is black, the last Deputy City Manager hired was female. Aurora has a track record of diverse hiring. To imply otherwise is demonstably false.

Sometimes, just maybe, a white male is the most qualified for a position. Sometimes, maybe, the most qualified for a job are persons of color or other historically marginalized groups but they are too smart to apply for an undesirable position likely to set their careers back.

If advocacy groups wanted participation and inclusion they should have been raising their voices eariler, and loudly. They could have been seeking out and promoting candidates to the search consultants, and to the population at large as I am certain the Sentinel would have provided a forum for such advocacy. Instead we have monday-morning quarterbacking going on.

BTW, Chief Wilson took on a nearly impossible task. I understand her personal relationships have cast her in a negative light recently, but she did well, given what she had to start with and not simply her lack of support from some, but deliberate and systematic undermining by some. I wish her well.

Hypocrisy Monitor
Hypocrisy Monitor
2 months ago

How do you speak for Aurora? Despite your incessant whining, I am certain you don’t speak for the majority of citizens who are MUCH more concerned with fighting crime in the neighborhoods than your cynical “diversity” which, in reality, is just identity politics favoring black and brown skin. And, in this case, criminals.

K. Smith
K. Smith
2 months ago

Incessant whining. And what is it you do here, sir?

Hypocrisy Monitor
Hypocrisy Monitor
2 months ago
Reply to  K. Smith

Well, observe, comment, call you out on your agenda and hypocrisy. Call it what you’d like. It’s your right.

Don
Don
2 months ago

The only thing letting activists take control is going to do is create more victims of crime. How anyone can look at the crime trends in all the big democrat cities and say yep, we need to keep letting democrats control this, and detached from reality. Keeping activists and democrats in charge is an open invitation for complete lawlessness. Denver will complete its transformation into San Fran sooner than you think, although Philadelphia is surging in an attempt to beat Denver there. Absolute democrat policy failures.

Doug
Doug
2 months ago
Reply to  Don

Fascism is coming soon right? Why even have a Bill Of Rights

DICK MOORE
DICK MOORE
2 months ago
Reply to  Doug

I have been trying hard, real hard to not comment here on all the far left wing comments because when I do it just develops more written hatred.

But dammit, Doug, your recent comments have been extremely silly, childlike and non sensible, both here and on nextdoor.

Maybe you could just start emailing Joe Felice and Debra Mackillop saying how smart you three are and stop boring the rest of us…or…

Just give your thinking a break and keep it to yourselves…please.

K. Smith
K. Smith
2 months ago
Reply to  DICK MOORE

And what do you consider your comments, Dick? Goodwill? Your hatred is palpable in your own comments sometimes. You could stand to keep your drivel to yourself, as well. Go find some joy in what life you have left.

Hypocrisy Monitor
Hypocrisy Monitor
2 months ago
Reply to  K. Smith

Look. In. The. Mirror.

Joe Felice
Joe Felice
2 months ago

Two things can be assumed:

  1. The person chosen will be a conservative, since he has to be approved by the majority of the City Council, and he will refer to legislators as “soft on crime.”
  2. Whatever the person says in interviews will not necessarily be what he will do in practice.

It will take a period of time to learn how the person chosen handles the job and difficult situations–probably a couple of years. We hope that the city gives him more time than it gave the former Chief Wilson. I hope both of these gentlemen realize the task with which they are faced. Trust with our minority communities is important and needs to be rebuilt. It is hoped that the new chief is able to figure out a way to retain existing officers and recruit new ones. Somehow, we need to have a fully-staffed PD if we are ever to expect proper enforcement of laws. We also hope that the person chosen will work with legislators at the city and state levels to enact legislation that would be beneficial and have real effects.

Can we try not to make this any-more political or race based than it needs to be? Whomever is selected should be given our support until such time as he demonstrates he doesn’t merit that. In other words, let’s enter this new era with positivity, not negativity.

Jeff Brown
Jeff Brown
2 months ago

The pool of candidates is so shallow because all see the writing on the wall.

The rubber will hit the road when the state AG concludes that APD isn’t capable of meeting the terms of the consent decree with its “we-make-do” policy each time a disciplinary matter is quietly and cheaply resolved in-house.

This is going to get ugly real quick and we can thank 30+ years of city council simply neglecting Aurora’s retail, dining and entertainment sectors (sales tax is the city’s primary source of revenue).

Sorry but the City of Aurora’s motto of “We make do” no longer flies. The candidates are so few because all see the writing on the wall.

DICK MOORE
DICK MOORE
2 months ago

Enough is enough. Mr. Twomby, please ask the over paid consultant to pick their best three black applicants, eliminate the two white guys already selected and pick one of the black guys. For me, as far as the two white guys, I despise Albuquerque and don’t think easterners think like we in the West.

It’s very obvious that Aurora’s black activists insist on a black person as chief. Please give it to them. I’m pretty sure most of us white citizens just wanted the best applicant with colorblindness. If it is so important to the black activists, give it to them, we don’t really care as we would just like to hire a chief and eliminate crime in our crime infested City. Let’s just get the selection done and out of the News.

Better yet, ask Pastor Mayes, Omar M. and Candice B. to select their favorite current black APD member and make him or her Chief as we would not need a consultant for that choice. Everybody wins.

Sandy
2 months ago
Reply to  DICK MOORE

They didn’t ask for a Black chief; they asked for input. So did members of the Hispanic community. Aurora has the highest percentage of minorities in the state. What’s wrong with consulting with these organizations? Geez.

Jason
Jason
2 months ago
Reply to  Sandy

According to this article, Mohamedbahi called it a missed opportunity to diversify the department from the top down. Mayes refused to participate in the selection process in part because the candidates of color weren’t finalists.

These people wanted a selection based on race, rather than based on qualifications. That isn’t just asking for input.

DICK MOORE
DICK MOORE
2 months ago
Reply to  Sandy

Geez, Sandy, how naive of you.

K. Smith
K. Smith
2 months ago
Reply to  DICK MOORE

Again. Hate. And thinly veiled fragility.

Dennis Duffy
Dennis Duffy
2 months ago

We will get some moronic buffoon shoved down our throats no matter what we belive because the system is broken. Who cares what color they are, I just hope the chosen one has a backbone and integrity,best you can wish for….

Michael L Moore
Michael L Moore
2 months ago

Well, this is another glitch in a long line of glitches. Wouldn’t it be prudent to ask affected citizens to provide input? It seems like people within city government are talking past each other. It would be refreshing to find a leader that would listen more and talk less. Isn’t that what we need? Since the last election citizens get to listen to a lot of lip, but not much reason.

Doug King
Doug King
2 months ago

let’s see them in action, let’s have the candidates debate each other in a wide range of policy questions from the diverse community they aim to police.

Berv
Berv
2 months ago

Did anyone ask these two men WHY they want THIS job? What possible motivation could they have to want to be Chief in AURORA, except that they can’t get that job anywhere else? That’s a bad reason to hire anybody for anything – and I think these guys probably have no good reason to want to get themselves into this mess. Sad to say that I don’t think any careerist should come to Aurora – right now, at this moment in Aurora’s history, whoever becomes our Chief of Police is in for the fight of their lives. Half our police force is violently opposed to change, and the other half knows we need it – and all polls show that the majority of our citizens want reforms, and the City Attorney’s office is all set to force those reforms – but Danielle Jurinsky proves she will try to destroy any reforms and the person who champions them to appease those resistant cops, too. Someone who wants to build a career as a Police Chief and ever work in that field again anywhere else should run as fast as they can from the quagmire of Aurora.

We really need a Chief that wants the job because they are invested in Aurora and they are ready for a fight for big changes – and that person is going to be fighting Councilwoman Jurinskily AND the half the police force to do it. Or we might get a guy who will buck the consent decree, and the state laws, and try to keep everything in the police department the way it’s been – and if they do that, they’ll have to fight the attorney general and the other half the police force and the other half the Council to do that. Has anyone asked these two gentlemen which of those fights they’re ready to lose their career for?

Jason
Jason
2 months ago
Reply to  Berv

No, no one thought to ask them that basic question yet.

GeneD
2 months ago
Reply to  Berv

The salary is great and, at least for one of the candidates, he couldn’t get any of the other chief jobs he applied for, so why not?

B CAR
B CAR
2 months ago

Judge a man not by the color of his skin, but by the content of his character.” MLK

Don Black
Don Black
2 months ago

I went before council and suggested a debate by those interested in the chief’s job. The public never gets to hear informed debate by those who actually know law enforcement. Those inside law enforcement find the stuff you are fed by most candidates to be absurd. It won’t change. Facts no longer matter. A real discussion of the consent decree would show that it is also absurd.

Dsn
Dsn
2 months ago

Why does diversity only include black and white. I haven’t heard any complaints that there were no Asian, Hispanic, or American Indian candidates. I personally would like to see an Asian chief of police. .