Aurora plans to purchase more than 30 additional Pallet shelters for city’s unhoused residents

4132
A pair of cowboy boots sit outside of a Pallet home, as the resident of the home rests inside, Nov. 17, 2021, at the Salvation Army in Aurora where 30 of these homes are located
Photo by PHILIP B. POSTON/Sentinel Colorado

AURORA | The City of Aurora is looking at adding more options to its housing stock for people experiencing homelessness in the city.

Lana Dalton of Aurora’s Department of Housing and Community Services updated council members during a Monday study session on safe parking, sanctioned camping and the Pallet shelters at the Salvation Army, describing how dozens of people have been sheltered since last year.

Since opening in June, the safe parking lot at 15660 E. Sixth Ave. has welcomed 20 vehicles, Dalton said, and 42% of the people who sheltered there went on to secure more permanent housing.

The Pallet shelters at 11701 E. 33rd Ave. have sheltered a total of 109 people since July, with the average person staying 80-90 days. Fourteen people were said to have moved on to other housing, and 26% obtained employment.

Dalton said the 25 tents set up at the 15660 E. Sixth Ave. location were not considered to be sustainable, as they cost $1,500 a week to heat.

“They’re running off of a generator, which is just not sustainable from a cost perspective,” she said.

Dalton told Councilmember Juan Marcano that people sheltering in the tents still have a hard time getting rest when temperatures drop.

She also mentioned that the city plans to spend $485,000 in federal grant money on infrastructure for the tents and Pallet shelters as well as 30-36 new shelters.

After Dalton said she did not anticipate the shelters would close down when the weather warms because of the demand for shelter space, Councilmember Francoise Bergan remarked that she was “concerned that it’s going to be a permanent situation when I thought it was going to be temporary.”

The update was only informational, and no decision was made by the council.

5 2 votes
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
6 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
vern
vern
3 months ago

Good that action may be on the ballot… if Council can get to action

Doug
Doug
3 months ago

With mayor Coffman’s camping band going into effect, why would Councilmember Francoise Bergan be “concerned that it’s going to be a permanent situation when I thought it was going to be temporary.” city has to have someplace to place the campers don’t they?

Doug King
Doug King
3 months ago

I thought these tents were insulated and it wouldn’t be too difficult to keep them heated…what kind of heat is being used? Is it the most efficient kind? Would a hook up to the grid not be a lot cheaper then a generator?

Bob
Bob
3 months ago

Think $1500 a week is to expensive for heating. Wait till summer’s here. It’s right around the corner. Wait till the generator bill hits for required A/C when it’s cooking hot on that blacktop pavement No one will be able to live on this death valley parking lot.
So then we can be importing plastic palm trees for a little shade.
What’s next?

Hanna
Hanna
3 months ago

Or they could start enforcing the law, stop enabling drug and alcohol addictions and drug dealers and spend the money on mental health care, because that would do more to fix the problems than this. But they are totally committed to doing everything that hasn’t worked, but do it more and maybe this time will be different.

Dean
3 months ago

“Denver could spend $3.9 million to expand its managed homeless camp program this year, as the City Council housing committee is scheduled to vote Wednesday on a contract amendment allocating the funds.”

“If approved by the council, the contract would fund at least four camps run by Colorado Village Collaborative through the end of 2022, sheltering roughly 370 people through the year. This would increase the program’s total funding to just under $4.8 million.”

“Colorado Village Collaborative now runs three of the camps, called Safe Outdoor Spaces, in the parking lots of the Human Services East Office, Regis University and Denver Health. There have been a total of six camps throughout the city since the program began in late 2020.”

Is this where Aurora’s plans for homeless is steadily headed?