Aurora City Council eyes proposal for photo speed enforcement cameras

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AURORA | City Council members signaled support Monday night for a 13-month pilot project of three vehicle-based photo speed cameras, which could be set up in residential areas or school zones to deter speeding. 

Chris Carleton of Aurora’s Police Department said one vehicle could be set up in each of the police department’s three districts. Violations captured on camera by the devices would be reviewed — either by a police officer, or, pending an amendment to city code, a non-sworn civilian employee — before a driver could be cited.

“The districts could address the speeding concerns in their particular areas of responsibility as the complaints come in,” Carleton said.

“We project that they would be mobile units,” said Scott Stewart of Conduent, one of the firms that Carleton said may be chosen to provide technology for the city. “You’ve got a lot of flexibility, so you could deploy wherever you saw an uptick in these incidents.”

This wouldn’t be the city’s first foray into traffic-related photo programs. The city removed 14 cameras at 10 intersections in 2019 after nearly two-thirds of voters decided to end the red light program, which generated more than $2.5 million per year. About half of that was set aside for local mental health programs and organizations that provide resources to people experiencing homelessness or assist domestic violence victims.

Much like the proposed photo speed cameras, designated staff would review violations.

According to police, traffic deaths increased 54% between 2019 and 2021, an upward trend that is continuing in 2022. Council members expressed their unanimous support for the pilot program, which would begin with a month of warnings issued before the department began issuing citations and fines.

The council did not oppose a suggestion by Coffman that proceeds from the program be used to offset operating costs, with any surplus dedicated to traffic calming projects.

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MediaMark
MediaMark
2 months ago

This feels like the personhood amendments. How many times must voters resoundingly reject something before the council hears them?

Doug
Doug
2 months ago

Yeah, I don’t see this as making their constituents happy

None
None
2 months ago

No Denver did this and it was scaled back by the lawmakers when they themselves were cited. So put them in their neighborhood.

Emily L Carroll
Emily L Carroll
2 months ago

It’s about time something is being done to address this increasingly dangerous problem! Are those who think this “infringes” on their rights the ones who run red lights? Go 20 mph over speed limits on our “residential racetracks”? And, Mayor Mike, what the heck are “traffic calming projects”???

isaac Hagos
isaac Hagos
2 months ago

That is not a solution.

DICK MOORE
2 months ago

The citizens of Aurora has a fairly recent vote that we do not want this type of traffic control by a large margin. It’s a very good revenue producer but we still do not want it. Don’t bring up traffic deaths unless you isolate those within a few feet of schools or in 25 mph residential zones. This is a project that should not be started, again. Please stop this campaign.

Garage Art
1 month ago

The traffic camera would have had a chance to survive if those millions earned were used to reduce traffic problems. We all pull up to a left turning lane that only allows four cars into the turning lane to then wait another light rotation before we can get more cars out of traffic. Reduced drive time with knowledge and this money then present it again to the voters. If the funds are used to fund thing like the DARE program, who used those funds to raise more funds. Unreal.