Aurora lawmaker: Move city council contests to general elections, reveal political parties

1216
Aurora City Council during its March 28, 2022 meeting at city hall.

AURORA | Every other year, a new crop of city lawmakers are elected by the fraction of Aurorans who turn out to vote — less than 31% of registered voters in 2021.

Odd-year local elections can be where the direction of policing, education, road maintenance and more are decided by city councils and school boards. But unlike even-year elections, which install congresspeople and presidents, local contests tend to draw a much smaller sample of the population, which tends to be older and wealthier than the jurisdiction as a whole.

It’s a situation that may tilt elections in favor of conservatives — a fact that one progressive council member didn’t dwell on while sharing proposals to increase voter turnout with lawmakers last week, including shifting council elections to even years and noting candidates’ party affiliation on ballots.

Councilmember Juan Marcano did focus on how other cities that don’t practice official nonpartisanship and those which shifted their elections to coincide with even-year races saw greater participation.

“We’re not alone in that problem,” Marcano said of year-to-year dips in voter turnout. “A lot of other cities have actually taken steps to correct that problem, and what they did is they ended up moving their elections to even years to coincide with state and federal elections.”

Conservative Francoise Bergan and Angela Lawson, fellow members of the city council committee where Marcano presented his proposals, were skeptical. Both said they were worried that changing the timing of elections would lead to fewer people researching the local candidates and issues up for consideration, leading the public to make uninformed decisions.

Aurora City Councilmember Juan Marcano during a March 14, 2022 meeting. SENTINEL SCREEN GRAB

Marcano said he believed the proposed changes could also help address the polarization and partisan conflict that has become ubiquitous on the council.

Aurora’s City Council is nonpartisan in the sense that a candidate’s party affiliation isn’t included on the municipal election ballot. But Aurora council members tend to decide controversial issues along party lines, and the current council is no stranger to open partisan conflict.

Progressives achieved a functional majority on council in the final year of the Trump presidency. But when Councilmember Nicole Johnston stepped down in June 2021, the liberal and conservative factions found themselves at a deadlock and failed to fill her vacant seat because they could not agree on a replacement.

Then, in November, voters elected a new crop of mostly conservative council members. A new majority of seven has guaranteed the success of conservative proposals such as Mayor Mike Coffman’s once-torpedoed homeless camping ban but hasn’t stopped hostility from erupting on and off the dais.

Council members have given one another nicknames like “the minister of propaganda” and walked out of meetings. In March, one member sponsored a resolution to ban “attacks of a personal nature” on the dais. A month and a half later, the same council member used Twitter to accuse two colleagues of misusing public funds.

“I think that one of the best cures that we have (for) some of the polarization that we’re experiencing in our country and really improving trust in our institutions is improving the participation in our local elections,” Marcano said.

He cited academic research focusing on changes in election timing in California cities, which reportedly led to a larger group that was more representative of the total population in terms of age, race and party affiliation casting votes in local contests.

According to an essay by University of California San Diego professor Zoltan Hajnal, which Marcano included in the committee’s agenda packet, off-cycle city elections in California may grant an outsized amount of power to an “extraordinarily unrepresentative set of residents” — politically active labor unions in some places and wealthy, white conservatives in others.

Under Marcano’s proposal, shifting local elections to even-numbered years would require council candidates elected in 2023 and 2025 to accept three-year terms rather than the typical four-year term, with on-cycle local elections beginning in 2026.

Aurora Councilmember Francoise Bergan at a June 27, 2022 City Council meeting

Bergan said the move would work against candidates trying to reach voters.

“We have a special election for City Council, and the attention is only on City Council. I feel like it gives us a better platform when you’re running for office to get your messages out to the voters,” Bergan said. “I think you might get greater participation, but I don’t think it’s going to be thoughtful participation.”

Marcano disagreed.

“I take offense, actually, to that characterization of our electorate,” Marcano replied. “It actually creates more cohesion around issues and candidates who are already basically building working relationships with folks who are running for other levels of government.”

He also suggested that the city start requiring candidates to declare their party affiliation or identify as unaffiliated on local ballots, which he said the city is permitted to do as a home-rule city.

Marcano argued, citing a statement from NYU Law’s ​​Brennan Center for Justice and an article by Rice University and University of Notre Dame professors, that the change could make it easier for voters to identify candidates who share their views and could also boost participation. 

The documents also indicate that officially nonpartisan elections may favor Republicans. In Aurora’s 2021 election, turnout among registered Democrats was lower than both Republicans and unaffiliated voters.

Bergan and Lawson both said they thought the change would turn people off to local politics by associating candidates with the country’s two dominant and frequently divisive political parties.

“One of the things that’s so interesting and makes municipal government unique is because it is nonpartisan,” said Lawson, who currently tends to vote with the council’s conservative bloc but identifies as unaffiliated. “Internally, let’s just be real, it is partisan. But … if you have people who are not trying to be in any of this and want to just run to do good for the people of the city and the community, then I think that’s attractive.”

Marcano said the lack of partisanship, at least in Aurora, is a myth.

“I don’t like the hyperpartisan, vitriolic environment that we have,” Marcano said. “The first step to addressing a problem is acknowledging that you have it. … I feel that it’s incumbent on us to be transparent with our residents.”

Related to the issue, Marcano and Lawson said they would work on a proposal for state lawmakers to prevent people from being barred by their employers for running for office in partisan races, which was another concern raised by Lawson. 

Lawson and Bergan also said they did not support an idea of Marcano’s to fill some council vacancies by having the group who filled out a departing candidate’s nominating petition vote on their replacement, saying those signatories may not be representative of the group that ultimately elected the candidate.

A proposal by Councilmember Alison Coombs to create a citizen committee to evaluate the city’s current charter was not heard because the related materials weren’t included in the committee’s agenda packet.

The Charter Review Ad Hoc Policy Committee is scheduled to meet next at 2:30 p.m. Aug. 23, when Coombs’ proposal may be considered. A public hearing will be scheduled after that.

3.7 9 votes
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest

10 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Hypocrisy Monitor
Hypocrisy Monitor
3 months ago

What Marcano is attempting to do could not be more apparent: Mobilize low-information voters who will blindly vote for their party without an iota of consideration for actual qualifications or recorded beliefs. A “blue wave” got his progressive predecessors into the municipal office before and he’s hoping the same can happen with his socialist comrades.

K. Smith
K. Smith
3 months ago

And how exactly do you think Republicans got a majority? There has never been a blue wave in Aurora. Democrats have never been in control. Your narrative is not only false, but exceptionally tiring.

Joe Felice
Joe Felice
3 months ago
Reply to  K. Smith

… especially the use of the word “socialist,” of which Mr Hypocrisy doesn’t even know the meaning.

Hypocrisy Monitor
Hypocrisy Monitor
3 months ago
Reply to  K. Smith

I think Rs gained the upper hand again when a liberal-leaning council did what they always do–overreach. You apparently were asleep when the Emerge girls (Hilltz, Johnston, Murillo) spent two years pushing their woke agenda through council with assistance from some less than conservative colleagues who may have not identified as Ds but voted as though they were. The voters voted to alleviate this. The current policies are still littered with a fixation on identity politics. IMO, the city council is not reversing this wrongheaded dogma fast enough.

Zero
Zero
3 months ago

Wait, let me get this straight…

So voters with no information is bad, you’re saying?

But you’re also saying we shouldn’t give them information, like which party the candidates belong to and which types of policies they want to enact in our city, right?

So don’t give them info, but people with no info can’t vote.

Kinda seems like maybe you just don’t want people you disagree with to vote, HM. Kinda seems like maybe its time you did a little hypocrisy monitoring in the mirror, friend.

Hypocrisy Monitor
Hypocrisy Monitor
3 months ago
Reply to  Zero

Typical strawman argument. Critical thinking is hard. Let me simplify for you. Party affiliation is an incomplete picture of a candidate. Contrary to what you seem to believe, groups are not a monolith. If voters care enough to vote, they should also care enough to educate themselves (i.e. which ones pay dues for a socialist membership.) Voting is easy for those who care to be informed. But you want the ones that don’t care, and lumping the municipal election in with all the other elections and ballot items is your way to get them. Straight party-line votes. Just admit you want to game the system. But you got one thing right: your username.

Last edited 3 months ago by Hypocrisy Monitor
Joe Felice
Joe Felice
3 months ago

I’m down with Marcano’s proposal. A perfect example is our last municipal election, which was basically a referendum on the camping ban. And people got elected because of low turnout. But if off-year elections favor republican candidates, this proposal has no chance of passing this council.

DICK MOORE
DICK MOORE
3 months ago

Our current City Council will not fall for this obvious socialist party ploy. Doesn’t require a lot of words from me to point it out.

Do you really believe that Marcano and Coombs would put “Socialist” on the ballot when they are actual card carrying Socialists. No, for political purposes, they would put “Democrat” to fool the voting public here in Aurora.

Vote these socialists out in the next odd year election. They are not true Democrats and wish to change the quality of life here in Aurora so to have City government control all aspects of our local life. Vote them out!

J Walter
J Walter
3 months ago

Mr. Marcano is so very clever with words. Remember, he told us that required jail for car thieves was unfair, because car theft is clearly about “inequality.” Actually, he was correct. You worked to buy a car, and the thief didn’t, so he felt un-equal, and stole your car. Don’t we all feel better? I think the City Council turned over BECAUSE of Marcano, Murillo, and their sort-of-socialist cronies.

Zero
Zero
3 months ago

All the people who think the neo-con dark money parade of Jurinsky, Zvonek, Sundberg won the election simply because Aurorans rejected the socialist radicals – then why don’t you want more Aurorans to vote? If a majority of Aurorans would just vote for conservatism anyway, why are you worried about conservatives having to declare themselves as conservative and then all the voters who you’re so sure would naturally agree with you can just vote and you’ll get the result you’re looking for, right? RIGHT?

Naw, the fact is that for all your being worried that Marcano is a socialist, the conservatives on Council have been openly pretending to be Democrats for literally 20 years to keep their jobs. Sundberg’s people knocked on doors and bald faced LIED and said he was a Democrat to win votes, and for years before him, Marsha Berzins own NEIGHBORS and friends thought she was a Democrat, she just quietly voted like a Republican every Monday night and nobody knew that she didn’t even represent them. Coffman made all his signs up when he ran for mayor with just his first name, trying to distance himself from his Republican reputation. Angela Lawson changes her party every year depending on who is in the majority, but she votes with the Republicans every time. Jurinsky’s old website didn’t have ANY actual policies or mention that she’s a Trump-flag waving alt-right convert, it was designed to try to trick voters into thinking she was a moderate Democrat without saying anything at all. These politicians aren’t afraid of partisanship, they’re afraid of having to be HONEST with voters – whether we like it or not, the fact of the matter is that the majority of Aurora is actually Democrats and it has been for a very long time – conservatives have just been quietly playing a very stupid game by tricking Democrats into not caring about city council and thinking it’s boring. At least Marcano wears his socialism on his actual sleeve with his silly pins – it’s time the rest of council did the same, and if we’re worried about “low info voters”, than instead of telling them not to vote (which is un-American and anti-democracy – our country is founded on the idea of voting!), we should just give them the info. Easy peasy, stop whining, conservatives – if you really think Aurora wants your policies and your leaders, let ’em all vote for you, oh popular and mighty kings of thought. 👀