COLORADO VOTES 2022: Incumbent Mandy Lindsay faces Republican challenger Cory Parella in House District 42

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Cory Parella and Mandy Lindsay

Mandy Lindsay is defending her House District 42 seat representing north and central Aurora from a challenge by Republican Cory Parella this fall.

Lindsay’s campaign platform includes creating housing options for all, repealing TABOR to help fund Colorado schools, stewarding the environment, improving access to health care and mental health care, and promoting abortion access.

In her Sentinel survey, she proposed to ban corporations from owning single-family homes and cap the number of non-owner-occupied residences. She also said she believed everyone in her district deserves housing, whether in homes, apartments or temporary housing for vulnerable groups.

“In communities like ours, the dream of homeownership is being snatched away (and the opportunity to grow wealth / generational wealth is becoming non-existent) and rents are rising sky-high, and as the cost of housing becomes completely unaffordable, more people will become unhoused,” Lindsay warned in her survey.

To lower the cost of health care, Lindsay proposes to expand the public option, which she says will also increase the number of providers available and promote transparent pricing. She described health care as a “human right” and said she believed the industry should not be for-profit.

“Every one of us should have access to quality and affordable healthcare that stays with us no matter where we live, or what  job we have,” Lindsay’s campaign website says. “Behavioral health is also an essential part of healthcare and we need to give people facing mental health challenges the same urgency and support for treatment as we would a patient with a broken arm.”

Abortion access was also highlighted as a priority for Lindsay, who said in her survey that her vote in favor of Colorado’s Reproductive Health Equity Act earlier this year was “easily one of the best votes I took this past session.”

“We have taken for granted the right for people to decide if, when, and how they become parents,” she wrote on her website. “Colorado must continue to bolster our citizens’ rights and stand out as a beacon for reproductive freedom in the region.”

Parella has a website, a YouTube channel, profiles on social media websites and multiple self-published books that address his religious beliefs and conservative politics.

The key issues of Parella’s campaign as expressed on his campaign site include “making abortion obsolete” by calling “on Science to make an artificial uterus to protect the lives of both mommy and baby,” creating a licensing program for Colorado’s film industry and repealing the Enhance Law Enforcement Integrity Act.

“This matter will not be resolved in an assembly or court room,” Parella said on the topic of abortion in his Sentinel survey. “I call on science to deliver an artificial uterus to sustain life from conception through self-sufficient breathing and nutrient consumption. And maybe this will cure miscarriages?”

Parella also made light of the Reproductive Health Equity Act and said that he supported the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.

On the topic of the entertainment industry, Parella promoted the idea of professional licensing for filmmakers, saying the film industry had the potential to be an economic driver for the region.

“‘Star Wars’ and ‘The Godfather’ made San Francisco a financial power,” his campaign website reads. “Movie DNA and year-round sporting events will give this part of the State more life than the southern counties. Get ready to prosper. Or move.”

He also wrote at length about public safety in the Sentinel survey, saying he thought Senate Bill 20-217 had been a “disaster” and questioning sympathetic accounts of the police beating of Rodney King and the death in custody of Elijah McClain.

He blamed specific Democrat lawmakers for public safety problems, particularly state Sen. Rhonda Fields, who he suggested was “dyslexic” and said unfairly accused police of racial profiling.

Parella advocated for a mix of public safety policies, including enforcement of anti-panhandling laws, amending Colorado’s habitual offender penalties so they would be triggered after five rather than three offenses, supporting the expansion of Comitis Crisis Center and opening up access to housing security deposit trusts.

A “Message to Drug Dealers” posted on Parella’s website also reads, “You are unwelcome here,” “Get your product off our streets and schools” and “I hunt you.”

Colorado’s general election is scheduled to take place Nov. 8.

Meet Mandy Lindsay

Mandy Lindsay

Mandy Lindsay

Small business owner Mandy Lindsay is running for election to the Colorado House District 42 seat that she was appointed to earlier this year to fill the vacancy left by Dominique Jackson, who Lindsay worked for as a legislative aide. Lindsay, a Democrat, has represented north and central Aurora since January. She is the owner of an organizing business and the parent of four children with her husband, Kevin. She is a graduate of Tulane University.

Mandy Lindsay Q&A

Should the state end partisan elections to the offices of state treasurer, secretary and attorney general, making them administrative positions nominated by the governor and confirmed by the state senate?

 

No.

 

Colorado recently enacted far-reaching reforms affecting police agencies across the state. Mandating truly independent review of police-related deaths and injuries wasn’t among the new requirements created by Senate Bill 20-217. Should every police agency be required to create some type of independent oversight mechanism?

 

Yes.

 

Despite many lauded changes in Obamacare, the cost of health care in Colorado and across the nation has continued to climb steadily, outpacing almost every other nation. What can the Legislature do to not just halt regular increases, but push down health care costs?

 

Expand and bolster the public option which lowers the cost of care to the consumer at point of service, increases the supply of medical professionals to meet health care demand, continues support of transparency in pricing and makes preventative care that reduces emergency care affordable and accessible.

 

Many argue that the generally poor condition of Colorado roads and underfunded schools is due in large part because of the Taxpayer's Bill of Rights, which prevents legislators from raising taxes and caps tax revenues, returning “excesses” to residents. Why is this true, and what’s the solution, or why is this untrue, and how can Colorado better fund roads and schools?

 

This is true. TABOR needs to be repealed. 

 

Some local city lawmakers were elected on a platform that they would lobby the state to repeal SB20-217, the Enhance Law Enforcement Integrity bill. Has this legislation positively or negatively impacted policing in Colorado? Would you propose any changes?

 

SB20-217 has positively impacted policing in Colorado and is important legislation to increase accountability.

 

Would you vote for a ban on so-called assault-style weapons? Why?

 

Yes. Private citizens have no need for deadly weapons of war that continue to be used in mass shootings in schools and other public spaces. We can enact common sense gun legislation that recognizes the Second Amendment and also helps protect the people of Colorado from gun violence.

 

Having legalized and regulated recreational marijuana, should Colorado pursue legalization of recreational psilocybin, also known as hallucinogenic mushrooms?

 

I am open to this prospect for this particular substance, assuming it follows a similar path to the legalization of marijuana. While I want safeguards in place to prevent minors from accessing this product, I support decriminalizing psilocybin use in a manner that is reasonable and safe.

 

Would you support legislation imposing restrictions on abortions, or should Colorado stay the course in preventing the government from making those decisions for women and their health care providers?

 

The legislature should do everything in its power to protect access to abortion. Every Coloradan deserves the right to determine the course of their future, and on the heels of the Dobbs decision that overturned Roe v. Wade this summer, it’s more important than ever that states protect these rights. Voting yes on HB22-1279 (the Reproductive Health Equity Act) was easily one of the best votes I took this past session.

 

If you could unilaterally write and impose any law you wanted, what would it be?

 

Ban corporations from owning single family housing and limit the number of non-owner-occupied residences. In communities like ours, the dream of homeownership is being snatched away (and the opportunity to grow wealth / generational wealth is becoming non-existent) and rents are rising sky-high, and as the cost of housing becomes completely unaffordable, more people will become unhoused.

 

If you could unilaterally sunset any existing Colorado law, which would it be?

 

The 1981 law that prevents local governments from enacting any rent stabilization measures that would meet the needs of their communities. In our current housing crisis, counties and municipalities should have the ability to consider all policy options available to them — with the end goal being that every person deserves a safe and warm place to sleep at night.

 

Should the state seek to prevent growth in communities that cannot prove sustainable water sources?

 

Yes. Water issues have always been important in our state, which is a semi-arid climate to begin with. We are blessed with headwaters of several major river systems, many of which are currently facing decline (from overuse and climate change) that impacts our water reservoirs. We cannot take our water for granted and treat it like it’s an ever-growing, unlimited resource. We must be thoughtful in how we plan for the future. We also must move away from lawns — 50% of municipal water use goes towards watering lawns and it’s a luxury that we cannot afford. 

 

Colorado cannot pave its way out of highway and road congestion and the air-quality problems it creates. Should the state make a concerted effort to reduce overburdened roads and highways some other way? How?

 

Yes. For one, by continuing the work begun by SB22-180, a grant program that made “Zero Fare for Better Air” a possibility in August of 2022. We should invest in public transportation to make it easier and more affordable for people to rely on their cars less, and for some, not at all. 

 

Do you trust the election process in Colorado? And will you accept the outcome of this election as announced?

 

Yes.

 

Do you believe the 2020 Presidential Election was absent of widespread fraud and fairly won by Joe Biden?

 

Yes.

Get to know Mandy Lindsay

What’s the most Colorado thing you’ve done recently?

 

Worn a dress with leggings because it was cold in the morning and then had to peel them off midday because the weather had completely changed and I was burning up!

 

What is the last concert you attended?

 

Harry Styles. I have a 15 year old daughter, enough said.

 

What restaurant do you frequent most?

 

Santiago’s!

 

If you had a superpower, what would it be?

 

Flying sounds amazing, but more useful in my actual life would be the ability to function perfectly well without sleep.

 

What was the last book you read?

 

The Witching Hour by Anne Rice (the October selection for my book club).

 

What is your least favorite household chore?

 

My initial inclination is to say the dishes — we don’t have a dishwasher and everything must get hand-washed around here. But I usually put on a great podcast (news, true crime, recaps of my favorite TV shows) and enjoy some “quiet time” while contemplatively scrubbing away!

 

If you had to pick one television show to watch forever, what would it be?

 

Schitt’s Creek, maybe? It’s a go-to, light-hearted, funny as heck, repeat watch, fave. “Ewww, David!”

 

Did you have any New Year's resolutions? What were they?

 

Oh yes, I am such a New Year’s resolution person! To focus on fitness and health (I’m 44 and can’t get away with things the way I used to), to spend more time with my parents, to read 52 books (not happening!), have things ready and complete a full day before they are due (sometimes happening!) and to organize my entire house from top to bottom.

 

What were you most excited to do after pandemic restrictions eased?

 

Go shopping at the ARC (I love setting pretty tables with thrifted dishes) and see movies at the theater (I’m a movie buff and also love award shows). 

 

What fun fact about you would most surprise people who know you?

 

That I *still* have my childhood “soft blankey.”

Meet Cory Parella

Cory Parella

Cory Parella is running as the Republican challenger in House District 42, which covers north and central Aurora. He is an author and screenwriter, earning master’s degrees in film post-production supervision from Academy of Art University in 2017; in business administration and management from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, in 2019; and in counseling psychology from Arizona State University. He has three children.

Cory Parella Q&A

Should the state end partisan elections to the offices of state treasurer, secretary and attorney general, making them administrative positions nominated by the governor and confirmed by the state senate?

No. In fact, I think we should hold more. I believe the reason Colorado has these elections is to avoid making the governor too powerful. To this end, the current governor has done more harm than good. A state senate confirmation isn’t enough accountability — for any reigning party.  My fellow Republicans can be just as near-sighted, given the opportunity.

Colorado recently enacted far-reaching reforms affecting police agencies across the state. Mandating truly independent review of police-related deaths and injuries wasn’t among the new requirements created by Senate Bill 20-217. Should every police agency be required to create some type of independent oversight mechanism?

217 does have such a mandate. It gives the bill’s co-sponsors precisely that authority, like a "Star Chamber" (1983, 20th Century Fox).

History tells us that internal affairs was supposed to serve this purpose. Instead, for most departments, IA has become a safety net for pay-per-justice. So my answer is yes, an independent oversight mechanism must be created, but how independent? Federal? Out of State? Independently elected?

Right now, the people in power can stack their respective decks to achieve the outcomes they desire. The only approach I believe that will resolve this is vice-chiefs voted into office by public election, who have the power to replace an ill-equipped chief. How many vice-chiefs? Let the people decide. Right now, at least in Aurora, the power wielded by the city manager isn’t serving the people.

Despite many lauded changes in Obamacare, the cost of health care in Colorado and across the nation has continued to climb steadily, outpacing almost every other nation. What can the Legislature do to not just halt regular increases, but push down health care costs?

I realize I am missing pieces here, but in theory, an open market fixes this. I would force health insurance providers to compete across all borders, not just North American. Medicaid is our safety net. "The Dallas Buyers Club" story shows us that our citizens will move mountains to get the care they need when the system fails them.

Odd hop: my added law.

Everyone struggles with call center workers who cannot speak the same language as the customer. Goal: we must understand each other, or the contract entered into for health care, or any service, is void.

I plan to pitch a bill that requires a formal test to qualify a worker as “multilingual” status. Most “English”-qualified call center workers contracted by service providers including health care companies, do not have enough English proficiency to serve the customer. Using this bill, they won’t be allowed on the phones unless they do. At this time, there is no regulation for multilingual status, hence, when you need something from a health care provider, they corral your phone call into a system designed for confusion. Only their sign-up reps, for billing information purposes, speak the same-language as the customers, with sufficient language proficiency. This is done on purpose. Once billable, they discard you and try to force you to use their poorly-designed App. My bill will require language proficiency among service providers.

Precedence: Nevada has food licenses for dishwashers. One cannot get a job washing dishes without a license. A written test is required to be approved for a license.

Many argue that the generally poor condition of Colorado roads and underfunded schools is due in large part because of the Taxpayer's Bill of Rights, which prevents legislators from raising taxes and caps tax revenues, returning “excesses” to residents. Why is this true, and what’s the solution, or why is this untrue, and how can Colorado better fund roads and schools?

First, kiss the school system as we knew it goodbye. For many this will be welcome news. 21st-century technology demands updated approaches to teaching. I’m working on a private sector plan, presented through venture capital investment, that will remedy the school dilemma. As for our roads, why aren’t we as capitalists adopting most roads?  Roads, like our schools, are best managed by local authorities, funded collectively by county, state and federal financial suitors.

Some local city lawmakers were elected on a platform that they would lobby the state to repeal SB20-217, the Enhance Law Enforcement Integrity bill. Has this legislation positively or negatively impacted policing in Colorado? Would you propose any changes?

This law has been a disaster. My dad was a cop from 1963-1991. I doubt he could have been as productive with 217 hovering over him every shift.  He did amazing things for people. The letters he got from people saying no one else would help them but my dad did, it was truly comforting. It still gets me choked up. If there is such a thing as a man of God, he was one. Laws were rewritten because of him. But not every cop is that talented or committed.

The idea behind truth-affirming shift-long audio and video surveillance has been with us for a long time. Many movies have offered glimpses of its strengths and weaknesses. George Lucas’ “THX 1138”, “Oceans 11”-13, “Fight Club” and “Die Hard” to name a few. Sometimes the video footage “saves” the innocent, and sometimes it paints a very dim view of what really happened. An example of not-everything-is-what-it-seems is Rodney King. He admitted many times over that he was rightfully stopped, on drugs, resisted arrest and was, in his frame of mind that night, willing to trade his life for not going to jail. The beating he took from officers was a waste of energy — they should have let him exhaust himself. I remember asking my dad how he handled situations like that. (And the Tucson Convention Center had its share of turbulent ice hockey games.) He said they always chose to wait out the influencer, meaning the drug or alcohol, with an occasional restraint. Then again, he was masterful with people, a truly gifted peaceful spirit who listened. If our police department had 50 Joe Parella’s, there’d be no more crime.

Can technology, along with increased civilian accountability, make a police force better? In theory, yes. Can it be done the way it was spelled out in SB-217? It needs to be pulled back, re-edited and reconsidered for all emergency service departments and branches of government — including the city council — if we want to be fair and equitable.

The fact is we live in a world where people lie to cover their tracks, and people have axes to grind. Term-limited state Sen. Rhonda Fields, who co-sponsored this bill, seems to want to roleplay Jean Valjean from “Les Miserables,” dismissing the police officer who she believes got the call wrong regarding every black person ever detained by police since the beginning of time. (She's silent when racial factors are reversed.)

The fact is a lot of things went wrong leading to where we are now. Bill and Debi Holen made a mess out of Aurora Public Schools. Some idiot appointed a vengeful and twisted lesbian police chief who had a twisted partner who’d attack any parent who didn’t reciprocate or role-play unwanted sexual advances. I don’t like City Councilwoman Danielle Jurinsky, but she didn’t deserve that. The parents of Elijah McClain apparently never taught him how to comply with police when asked to stop. He wore a ski mask in a convenience store. So what, some say? I get racially profiled when I don’t shave on a given day, and I’m Italian. The young man was taught to use his disability (not merely his self-proclaimed "introvertism") as a deflective tool to brush off the officers instead of complying. I’ve been falsely accused, and falsely arrested as well. I didn’t fight them.

The use of sedatives on detainees is ridiculous. The recently-disclosed false coroner report of McClain is also ridiculous.

What do we have wired into 217? A "Star Chamber". (1983, 20th Century Fox)

If I am on the Star Chamber committee, and I don’t like the look on your face, or you’re having a bad nose hair day, I can terminate your badge and your law enforcement license, thus sayeth the Lord - (I mean Rhonda Fields), and the bill’s other co-sponsors. It gives absolute power to those on that committee.

At the AG debate, Rhonda talked about being grateful for the police (that we still had left) awkwardly, self-aware that the number of officers of Aurora Police has dwindled to such a low amount. The long delays in 911 call responses are essentially her fault. Be careful what you ask for, Rhonda, you just might get it all.

Once upon a time, police could collaborate on a unified story and that’s all that was needed for a judge to sign-off on a lie. Internal affairs was born from that, but even that has its flaws.

Enter car-mounted cameras and body cameras. They all tell part of the story.

And recently, conservative messiah councilwoman Danielle Jurinsky was called out trying to use 217 with favoritism, so this is not about profile-based favoritism. It’s about getting the call correct in the field when someone calls 911. Why don’t our officers know the law better? My dad was required to memorize the law or he was sent to a classroom until he could pass a written exam that allowed him to return to the field. Have we stopped doing this?

As for 217, come Spring Session 2023, I vow to repeal it and rewrite it.

When I read it for the first time, I came to two conclusions. 1) It is fundamentally flawed, built around a few scenarios rather than a broad spectrum of law. What Ms. Fields needs is a “Quantum Leap” episode where Sam saves her son. What no law should do is give Rhonda Fields absolute power over heaven, earth and anyone who may disagree with the Star Chamber she created to reign over the entire police department. 2) Its authors, whether Ms. Fields or another, have dyslexia. Its grammar is atrocious. I can write. I’ll help fix this. It needs at least one more healthy draft to re-assert what its authors were trying to say without costing us the whole police department. I believe its authors gambled that the majority of officers wouldn’t walk off the job. Its authors were wrong.

No one can be expected to do their best work under 24-hour surveillance. Wyatt Earp wouldn’t have accepted this job, and he was as tough as they came. Rhonda Fields would have most likely accused Wyatt Earp of racial profiling.

Would you vote for a ban on so-called assault-style weapons? Why?

No. We need to protect our Second Amendment. Criminals ignore any such bans, and I refuse to penalize law-abiding citizens. Also, define “assault” weapon. Many anti-gun advocates would ban squirt guns if they could.

I also support non-lethal weapons issued to trained teachers in schools until the structure of our schools updates beyond the 18th-century format. Every school shooting and rape / murder of a teacher is avoidable.

Having legalized and regulated recreational marijuana, should Colorado pursue legalization of recreational psilocybin, also known as hallucinogenic mushrooms?

I shall flip a coin. Heads — I lose the right-wing vote over morality issues. Tails — I lose the left for my personal dissatisfaction with the drug lifestyle glorified in Kevin Smith’s “Clerks.”

I would raise the 420 minimum age and consider the medical purposes for psilocybin and mushrooms that make everything resemble a cartoon. Research suggests they may be a brief relief from mental illness. As a Republican, our core DNA is the free market. Let’s see what good science can make of it. I want to give our licensed healers every tool I can to deliver great quality of life.

Would you support legislation imposing restrictions on abortions, or should Colorado stay the course in preventing the government from making those decisions for women and their health care providers?

I support the repeal of Roe v. Wade. I acknowledge the passage of RHEA, which my fellow Republicans and I nickname the Dia-RHEA bill. My approach to this is different from being simply pro-life or -choice.

I support the rights of both Mommy and Baby.

As President Kennedy willed us to the moon, I will us to the womb.

This matter will not be resolved in an assembly or court room. I call on science to deliver an artificial uterus to sustain life from conception through self-sufficient breathing and nutrient consumption. And maybe this will cure miscarriages?

If you could unilaterally write and impose any law you wanted, what would it be?

Pro licensing for movie makers. Really beneficial conditions apply, benefiting both the media and our school system. Accountability, credibility and funding for our movie scholars, tax revenue rooted to our local community. Imagine the cash flow of Star Wars and the Godfather, here.

If you could unilaterally sunset any existing Colorado law, which would it be?

SB217 - The need for accountability remains ongoing, but this half-baked version falls short of expectations. Aurora resembles the first third of Robocop.

Should the state seek to prevent growth in communities that cannot prove sustainable water sources?

No. Playing God is fun, but in the end, leave that job to Him. Real estate developers have geologists. Don’t believe everything you see on the Discovery Channel. The earth has plenty of water. We need to share it more efficiently. I grew up in Tucson. We were told we would run out of water by 2000.

Colorado cannot pave its way out of highway and road congestion and the air-quality problems it creates. Should the state make a concerted effort to reduce overburdened roads and highways some other way? How?

No. Are we going to order every third-resident to stay home a few days per week? The air quality is not the result of highway traffic. Many air quality conditions exist without a single car engine revving.

As for road congestion, mandatory electric cars are not going to solve the problem either. People want the freedom to carry on regardless of the type of engine their vehicle has. Now, Republican DNA suggests the less government the better, but I believe an indirect marketplace condition will continue to affect this condition.

Had President Trump remained in office in 2021, I believe we’d all be using national WiFi right now — a strong signal, not the weak signal you get at the public library. If we have access to free highest-speed WiFi, that which we choose to leave the house for changes. This alters our transportation needs dramatically. Anyone else remember when computer printer ink was called the oil of the 20th century? The iPad changed that. The PDF file, among others, changed that.

Do you trust the election process in Colorado? And will you accept the outcome of this election as announced?

Ahh, the subject of much debate. I admit, I am nervous about it. I often wonder how much of a lead I will need before I see it evaporate after the polls close and the other team realizes they are down by just a few votes. This happened to my HD42 district chair Jono Scott. I will honor it; I wouldn’t use the word accept. Even if I win, I do think funky, unexplainable things await us on November 8th.

Do you believe the 2020 Presidential Election was absent of widespread fraud and fairly won by Joe Biden?

Yes and no. My theory is just that, a theory. First, I prayed to God why He would allow Joe Biden to take the White House. The answer I felt back was that God tolerates bad kings. “In your weakness, my power is made perfect.” In my opinion, this president is one of the worst we ever had. For the worst, we have to go back to the 18th and early 19th century. I didn’t like Obama, but he wasn’t the worst.

As for the machines and the actions of people in the position to help the Dems win? A lot of things went wrong. In one sense, I don’t believe the Dominion machines malfunctioned, like the computer of “2001: A Space Odyssey”, they did exactly what they were programmed to do. (In the film, it was discovered that Hal was programmed to lie, causing the deaths of the astronauts.)

Recall the film “Man of the Year” starring Robin Williams, anyone? “Double G, Double L.” And Robin gets elected president by accident. I don’t believe it was fixed. I do believe it was a series of errors that worked out for Joe Biden. Not all the Democrat candidates won. Wouldn’t you think if it was truly rigged, more Democrats would have won?

Our validation system is bluntly imperfect. I voted for President Trump twice and will again, but our own Secretary of State’s Office confirmed there is no way for me to confirm my vote for Trump counted for Trump. For all I know my vote for Trump was counted for Roger Rabbit.

In-party, I suggested the possibility of combining photo-ID validation with mail-in ballots; the best of both worlds. How? I don’t know. Our current validation system is thus: if a married couple with the same last name accidentally fills out and signs each other’s ballots, the system won’t detect the error. And apparently that’s okay with the current head of voter validation, per a faculty tour taken by our team.

As for “fixed” events, here’s another concept I want to offer. Why did all of the pre-trial hearings refuse to allow the witnesses and evidence presented to be heard at a Trial? After staring both thousands of witnesses in the face, and as-many documented proofs of WTF, yet Dem after Dem verbally declared each witness non-credible, and that they didn’t exist, the media reinforcing that message. Hear no evil, see no evil, speak no evil. Even today, YouTube warns me before publishing anything that by suggesting the 2020 Election was anything but smooth and fair I risk disciplinary action. That feels slightly Nazi to me. Arapahoe County Clerk Joan Lopez looked me in the eyes and said, “We know the election was messed up.”

That, I believe, was an old trick invented by the Republicans centuries ago, used effectively by the Dems in 2020.  And they got what they wanted. And the people now hate them for it.

Also noteworthy, except for trolls on Twitter, I have not yet met a single person who voted for Joe Biden. But, maybe I need to get out more. 81 Million? In my opinion, that’s a lot of imaginary friends.

Get to know Cory Parella

What’s the most Colorado thing you’ve done recently?

I dated my sister. (Humor). Okay, seriously. I watched a Broncos game. Forgive me, my favorite team plays on Saturdays. A Tucson native, I still love my University of Arizona Wildcats.

What is the last concert you attended?

Oh gosh, the mere question makes me feel old. Concert… I worked for Argus briefly and saw a lot of crap for free. The last one I paid to see and liked it was Matthew West. Love Matty.

What restaurant do you frequent most?

There’s a Mexican restaurant near my home where my campaign manager and I frequent when we celebrate a milestone. Los Gordos. Amazing food in a neighborhood that will benefit from my panhandling enforcement plan.

If you had a superpower, what would it be?

Multiply my bank account. Jesus taught us to hold what we have in our hands, give thanks, break it, and wait for the overflow of fish and loaves. I’m working on it. 😉

Honorable mention: cause all drivers to be safer.

What was the last book you read?

The last book I read was for grad school, about substance abuse recovery. The last fiction book I read was a quasi-edit of my own title, “Justin Time.” (I scribed several novels before entering politics.) My last for-pleasure book — the Bible and “Lute! The Seasons of My Life”. Abraham Lincoln preferred his Bible and Frederick Douglass’ autobiography bedside. I’ve got my Bible and Lute.

What is your least favorite household chore?

Cleaning other people’s urine. I use the toilet too, but yikes.

If you had to pick one television show to watch forever, what would it be?

Quantum Leap.

I’m here in Aurora, Colorado as a part of an experiment to time travel within my own lifetime, I stumbled into the accelerator and vanished. Waking to a mirror image that was not my own, I found myself driven by a very-known force to change history for the better. My guide on this journey is the HS (Holy Spirit), an observer from the future whom I can see and hear. So, I go from person to person I meet here, striving to put right what once went wrong, hoping the next leap will be the leap to… the White House.

I plan to be the 48th President.  (Cue blue light.)

Honorable mentions: The West Wing and Cobra Kai.

Did you have any New Year's resolutions? What were they?

I did. Produce a screenplay for Will Smith. You saw the Oscars. I filed for candidacy right after.

What were you most excited to do after pandemic restrictions eased?

Return to make Star Wars and Muppet movies. That’s what I was trained in before entering politics. I learned I am natural here. All my skills and gifts apply beautifully.

What fun fact about you would most surprise people who know you?

I can do auctioneering, and I was a special events emcee / DJ for 15 years. There are hundreds of pictures of me floating around other people’s wedding pictures resembling Adam Sandler from “The Wedding Singer”. I worked as a stand-up comedian in Vegas during grad school. My first movie job was as a stunt double for Tom Cruise. My granddad worked for Joey Bonano, whom Marlon Brando portrayed in “The Godfather”. “The Offer” got some of the story right… my version is called “The Faithful”, published 10 years ago.

 

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