Parkside residents return to find Aurora apartments ‘ransacked’ after explosion

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AURORA | Residents of the Parkside Collective apartment complex in central Aurora are reporting a rash of burglaries after they were forced to leave due to an explosion last week.

In a Facebook group set up to organize victims of the disaster, numerous posts show pictures of holes smashed in apartment doors and furniture knocked over, accompanied by accounts of homes reportedly being looted of thousands of dollars in property.

Amanda Edwards, a Parkside resident since May, said she entered her apartment Saturday to find it “ransacked” and discovered that small valuables such as electronics and jewelry were missing. She and other residents visited Parkside on Saturday to pick up compensatory checks promised by property management company Holland Residential and visit their apartments.

“We went upstairs to find a plethora of apartments broken into,” she said. “It’s all over the news that no one’s there. You would think we would have security.”

Residents were not allowed to return following an explosion on Sept. 10, which was witnessed by numerous bystanders.

Another resident, Matt Lynn, said he counted seven doors with signs of forced entry on the complex’s fifth floor. His apartment was not looted and his door was not broken, but he and others on social media said their refrigerators and freezers had been cleared out without their permission.

The inside of an apartment that the resident said was burglarized while residents were prevented from returning. PHOTO SUPPLIED BY RESIDENT

“It’s absolutely unreal,” Lynn said. “I would think at minimum if you had a mid-rise with more than 200 units, and no power, you would do everything you could to get extra security, not just for your tenants but for your own liability.”

Aurora Police Department spokesman Faith Goodrich said Saturday that police have received upward of 30 reports of burglaries at the complex since the explosion.

“We’re anticipating that number is only going to go up,” she added, saying some residents have not been able to return to their apartments.

While Goodrich said she heard the property manager, Holland Residential, will be hiring private security to guard the complex, she also said Aurora police are being stationed around the complex to deter further looting.

Holland Residential has not responded to multiple inquiries from The Sentinel regarding the explosion and its aftermath. Edwards and Lynn said they did not know whether or how many security staff had been hired to guard the complex after the blast.

Residents were not allowed to return to their apartments after the evacuation Sept. 10 until the 11th, when small groups were allowed in for brief periods to retrieve necessary items.

A few days later, Holland Residential told residents in an email that their building would be uninhabitable for “several months.” They also said the “building department” had not authorized residents to return and retrieve most of their belongings, though the city and Arapahoe County both said they would not have issued that guidance.

Investigators have not shared information about the potential cause of the explosion; Aurora Fire Rescue did not respond to a request for comment Saturday.

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Omen Cross
Omen Cross
15 days ago

Wait a minute. This was the first thing I called. Proper security wS not in place, and looters stole what owners weren’t allowed to go get. Great job guys, I saw this all coming, said stuff about it, and you still let it happen anyway. Genius, pure genius.

Joe Felice
Joe Felice
13 days ago
Reply to  Omen Cross

As a retired property manager, I also was concerned about this.

Gerti Ingalls
Gerti Ingalls
12 days ago
Reply to  Omen Cross

You absolutely called it, Omen. And you called that there was something City Council could do – because if there are Aurora Police there now, that means Aurora Police should have been there earlier, and City Council could have acted to make that happen, right??

Omen Cross
Omen Cross
15 days ago

Oh, by the way. For those who were discussing the point at which the property management company becomes liable for the associated loss of displacement of these residents. I believe at the point which they fail to properly keep secure all that the residents weren’t allowed to go get they became liable. For the value of anything stolen, damaged, or destroyed because of that. That liability basically proves their fault here. So yeah, probably time to go get some lawyers.

Last edited 15 days ago by Omen Cross
Omen Cross
Omen Cross
15 days ago
Reply to  Omen Cross

And though they employ lawyers on the Council to protect them, for being warned when the explosion initially happened by at least me personally and doing nothing, the City may fall closer to liability as well. I have proof of messages sent directly insisting that extra security of some kind needed put at the building. Guess they were too busy, despite how many of them are like right next door at the courthouse and City Hall all day.

Joe Felice
Joe Felice
13 days ago
Reply to  Omen Cross

This could be the case. I maintain it would constitute negligence, which is actionable. All losses are covered by insurance, so the tenants only fiscal damage may be their deductibles. It would be up to the insurance carriers to subrogate for their losses.