AURORA VOTE 2021: WARD I – Oldest part of Aurora brings new names

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There are three hopefuls in the Ward I race. Incumbent Crystal Murillo, who has served one term and is the city’s youngest and first Latina council member; Scott Liva, who moved to Aurora in 2015; and Bill Gondrez, who was brought to Aurora by his military career nearly three decades ago. The ward sits in Adams County, north of East Colfax Ave. It includes economic drivers such as the Anschutz Medical Campus, a growing food and entertainment scene and some of the most diverse neighborhoods in the Denver metroplex.

There are three hopefuls in the Ward I race. Incumbent Crystal Murillo, who has served one term and is the city’s youngest and first Latina council member; Scott Liva, who moved to Aurora in 2015; and Bill Gondrez, who was brought to Aurora by his military career nearly three decades ago. The ward sits in Adams County, north of East Colfax Ave. It includes economic drivers such as the Anschutz Medical Campus, a growing food and entertainment scene and some of the most diverse neighborhoods in the Denver metroplex. 

In 2017, Crystal Murillo was the youngest and first Latina to be elected to the Aurora City Council. Now, the life-long Ward I resident faces two opponents, one a resident since 1992 and the other a newcomer who landed in north Aurora for its less costly housing.

Scott Liva moved to Aurora in 2015. He told the Sentinel  he decided on moving into Ward I because of its affordability compared to other parts of the region. He’s worked in property management and is now a state utility plant operator.

Bill Gondrez has been in Aurora nearly three decades, serving an assignment at the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center as a Chaplain’s Fund Manager and then continuing to work as a hospital chaplain after his military retirement. He is currently an educator at Kenton Elementary School.

The trio of candidates say they’ve seen and even experienced the rising costs of housing in north Aurora, which Ward I encompasses. In Aurora’s 80010 zip code, which comprises neighborhoods along the Colfax corridor and farther south in Delmar Park, inventory is down 50% over last year and pricing is up nearly 30%, according to September data from the Colorado Association of Realtors.

One of the most affordable places in the region now comes with a hot housing market where the average cost of a single-family home is $400,000. Average rents for a one-bedroom apartment in neighborhoods in northwest Aurora hover around $1,300, according to RentCafe.

The city has taken actions, such as allowing accessory dwelling units in Original Aurora-zoned homes and assembling a task force to study the impact of disappearing mobile home parks, one of which forced dozens of families out of a park near I-225 and East Colfax Avenue. in 2018. Then-Mayor Bob LeGare worked to secure $300,000 so the families could move to other, less affordable housing options.

Murillo touts her involvement in the approval of a 2019 housing study as the first steps of addressing the overall affordability issue. 

“I have and will continue to support the creation of land trusts that create affordable units long-term as this preserves our affordable housing. We should continue to partner with affordable housing developers like Habitat for Humanity and others,” she says in her candidate survey. “I have also supported amending our codes and ordinances to allow for development waivers to reduce the cost of producing more affordable units, thereby allowing more units to be built.”

Liva said he’d like to see more barriers removed for innovative housing in his ward, though didn’t clarify which ones.

During a September 29 candidate forum, Gondrez said he supports “attainable housing,” but couldn’t offer any specific policies on what getting there would look like. In his candidate survey he said in an effort to aid homebuyers in the ward, he’d like to see the city attempt to incentivize buyers through help with down payments and closing costs.

The ward is also no stranger to rising crime rates. To address it, Liva said he’d like to see a restructuring of the police department to include unarmed officers who respond to calls. That’s an effort already underway in the 2022 budget. 

Gondrez said a better-trained police force, one that could meet the goals police leadership has already set out for itself, would be a start.

Murillo, who advocated for money for foot patrol along the Colfax Corridor this year, said she favors an approach that can avoid the police when necessary. She said she’d like to further build out programs that send mental unarmed health specialists to people in need.

Alongside crime, police accountability has been particularly important in north Aurora. Elijah McClain, a 23-year-old Black man, died after he was wrongly stopped, detained and injected with Ketamine by Aurora police and paramedics in August 2019. 

His death sparked a significant push to reform the Aurora Police Department and the Civil Service Commission, which currently oversees officer discipline. At the promise of City Manager Jim Twombly, the city will have its first independent police oversight office, disconnected from the department itself in 2022.

Gondrez said he doesn’t support the move. 

“I think that too many cooks spoil the cake,” he said.

Murillo said she would.

Meet Bill Gondrez

Bill Gondrez, photo supplied

Bill Gondrez and his family arrived in Aurora in 1992. After being reassigned to Korea, he returned to an assignment at the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center as a Chaplain’s Fund Manager within the U.S. Army Chaplaincy Regiment. After retiring from the Army, Gondrez spent another 16 years as a hospital chaplain. While living in Ward I he’s taken on several community service projects, most revolving around the beautification of local neighborhoods, and he’s served on a variety of local boards and committees. Today, Gondrez is an educator at Kenton Elementary School.

Bill Gondrez Q&A

Housing prices have hit record highs in Ward I, which traditionally has some of the most affordable neighborhoods in the city. What would you do to preserve both affordable and attainable housing in your ward? 

The city needs to create an incentive program for “first time” homeowners to assist them with down payments, closing costs and assistance with final paperwork.

The City Council has taken steps to oversee health and safety in the privately-owned immigrant detention center in north Aurora by mandating it report infectious outbreaks to the fire department. Would you support more measures to oversee the facility? If so, what kind? 

No, I would not due to the fact that the company is contracted with the Federal government.

Proposals to address visible homelessness have ranged from an urban camping ban — which Mayor Mike Coffman has committed to bring back for a second vote — to adding safe parking lots and additional shelter space. Which policies would you be in favor of? Would you support the camping ban? 

Camping bans only address the symptoms not the root cause of this situation. We, together, need to eradicate the homeless issue once and for all. I am in favor of creating a homeless campaign to establish funds and to assist the homeless program director of the city and the housing director. To bank the funds with a non-profit organization to manage and disperse as needed toward different aspects. I propose Tiny Homes on city properties; security contracted by the city and managed for a short period, until the “dust settles” and the program gets off the ground and is well established. Eventually, the residents themselves will provide their own security. Additionally, we will have faith-based organizations to conduct outreaches to assist the program. The city will have work-force volunteer vans for the folks to travel around the city to pick up trash, and eradicate over grown vegetation. They will receive minimum wage earnings.

Would you support increasing the minimum wage in Aurora? Why? 

I am not in favor of increasing any minimum wage earnings until this pandemic is over. We are already losing our small business base. Currently, the federal government is struggling to assist small businesses. We don’t need to add to the problem.

Do you support Aurora forming its own county? Why? 

No, I do not support Aurora becoming its own county because it would require the entire state of Colorado to vote and pass. The voters did not support this in the past partly due to the fact that it would split Arapahoe County and also due to the great expense. 

What is the city’s most pressing transportation need? 

Our most pressing transportation need is to repair what we already have with our roads, bridges, and upgrade our sidewalks to federal standards.

Do you think the city does a good job of marketing itself? If not, what can be done differently? Is it important? 

It is very important for any city to market itself in this economy. The city of Aurora has established a great marketing plan that works. “Visit Aurora” is reaching out and is now located in a more visible area.

Should Aurora limit or ban giving financial incentives to businesses in an effort to lure them to Aurora? Examples where large incentives were offered include the Gaylord and Amazon projects. Critics call these “corporate welfare,” but proponents say they’re a critical part of economic development and creating jobs. 

No. Now is not the time to cancel incentives for our small business. We are still in a crisis situation due to the pandemic. 

Crime rates have increased in Aurora in the past two years. What can the city council do to address that problem? How do you think any new proposals related to controlling crime should be funded? 

The city council can address the problem of the crime rate by helping the leadership of the Aurora Police Department to meet the goals that they have set out for themselves. Also, upgrade the recruiting and training within the police academy to meet the growing demands of our ever-changing society.

The Aurora Police Department and the Civil Service Commision have been the subject of many high profile incidents – notably regarding the death of Elijah McClain – and consequently the subject of intense scrutiny from investigative reports. Would you support additional oversight of the Aurora Police Department? If so, what do you think that should look like? 

I think that “too many cooks spoil the cake”. So I do not support any additional oversite for APD.

More about Bill Gondrez

What was the last book you read? I read the Bible daily. The last book I read was titled “Not a Fan.” By Kyle Idleman

What has been your pandemic guilty pleasure? 

Building my pergola and painting it.

If you were stuck on a deserted island, what are three things you would want to bring? 

The three thing I would want to bring is, 1) My Bible; 2) and First Aid kit; and 3) a knife

What do you think needs to be invented more than anything? 

The invention of a flying car that actually works and is economically reachable for the average person.

If you were going to staycation in Aurora, what activities would you do? I like to go to plays and eat good food, to meet friends and have a good time.

 

Meet Scott Liva

Scott Liva. Ward I City Council Candidate. Photo provided by Scott Liva

Scott Liva moved to Aurora in 2015 when looking for an affordable home in the Denver metroplex. He’s been in Colorado since 1996. Now a state utility plant operator working second shift, Liva formerly served as an engineering director for a property management company.

Scott Liva Q&A

Housing prices have hit record highs in Ward I, which traditionally has some of the most affordable neighborhoods in the city. What would you do to preserve both affordable and attainable housing in your ward?

I have walked to over 5000 homes in Ward I and have seen that there are few opportunities to buy or rent. As a councilman I would work to remove barriers to innovation in housing.

The City Council has taken steps to oversee health and safety in the privately-owned immigrant detention center in north Aurora by mandating it report infectious outbreaks to the fire department. Would you support more measures to oversee the facility? If so, what kind?

The immigration facility should be subject to the same inspections as a restaurant or hotel.

Proposals to address visible homelessness have ranged from an urban camping ban — which Mayor Mike Coffman has committed to bring back for a second vote — to adding safe parking lots and additional shelter space. Which policies would you be in favor of? Would you support the camping ban?

Public campgrounds for long term camping must be built to provide dignity and mailing address’ to citizens living in tents and recreational vehicles. 

Would you support increasing the minimum wage in Aurora? Why?

Minimum wage is a Federal law.

Do you support Aurora forming its own county? Why?

 No. Arapahoe county is run efficiently.

What is the city’s most pressing transportation need?

RTD is doing a good job.

Do you think the city does a good job of marketing itself? If not, what can be done differently? Is it important?

Aurora’s marketing is constantly undermined by the Aurora Police Department.

Should Aurora limit or ban giving financial incentives to businesses in an effort to lure them to Aurora? Examples where large incentives were offered include the Gaylord and Amazon projects. Critics call these “corporate welfare,” but proponents say they’re a critical part of economic development and creating jobs.

The city council should work to lower costs for all business’ in Aurora. My campaign has not accepted any contributions and is not beholding to any interests unlike my opponents who have taken tens of thousands of dollars to promote themselves.

Crime rates have increased in Aurora in the past two years. What can the city council do to address that problem? How do you think any new proposals related to controlling crime should be funded?

The Aurora Police Department must be restructured to include a mix of armed and unarmed responders in order to pivot from being an authoritarian hammer into a true community resource. 

The Aurora Police Department and the Civil Service Commision have been the subject of many high profile incidents – notably regarding the death of Elijah McClain – and consequently the subject of intense scrutiny from investigative reports. Would you support additional oversight of the Aurora Police Department? If so, what do you think that should look like?

The Aurora Police Department must be restructured to include a mix of armed and unarmed responders in order to pivot from being an authoritarian hammer into a true community resource. 

More about Scott Liva

here Did the Towers Go? by Dr. Judy Wood

What has been your pandemic guilty pleasure? Piano practice

If you were stuck on a deserted island, what are three things you would want to bring? 

Food, water, toothbrush 

What do you think needs to be invented more than anything? 

anti-glycation pharmacueticals 

If you were going to staycation in Aurora, what activities would you do? 

Boating at the reservoir, eating at L&L Hawaiian BBQ, bicycling on the trails and paths.

 

Meet Crystal Murillo

Crystal Murillo. Ward I City Council Candidate. Photo provided by Crystal Murillo

A lifelong resident of Aurora, Council Member Crystal Murillo graduated from Smoky Hill High School in 2011. She continued on to the University of Denver, where she was the first in her family to earn a bachelor’s degree. Murillo continues to serve her alma mater

today as a diversity coordinator. Murillo was the youngest and first Latina to be elected to the Aurora City Council in 2017. While on council, Murillo has served on several boards and commissions as a local government representative.

Crystal Murillo Q&A

s in Ward I, which traditionally has some of the most affordable neighborhoods in the city. What would you do to preserve both affordable and attainable housing in your ward? 

For the past three+ years I’ve been on council, housing has been my primary focus. Before I was on council, Aurora did not study gentrification. It does now since I was the Chair of the Housing Committee. In that role, I commissioned a housing study in 2019 and then got the City Council to approve our first strategic housing plan in 2020. We’ve also established Aurora’s first Housing Department and passed a resolution affirming Housing is a Human Right, committing our city to equitable policies. We are now at a point where we can work to alleviate the housing crisis in our City and be a leader in the state with a data-informed, strategic plan. These were some of the critical first steps I took to ensure we had the infrastructure to preserve our affordable and attainable housing.

I believe we should make decisions that create a healthy and vibrant community that’s accessible to all. For housing to be “affordable” it requires a variety of quality housing options for people at all stages in their lives, with emphasis on supporting our most vulnerable and creating wealth building opportunities. I have and will continue to support the creation of land trusts that create affordable units long-term as this preserves our affordable housing. We should continue to partner with affordable housing developers like Habitat for Humanity and others. I have also supported amending our codes and ordinances to allow for development waivers to reduce the cost of producing more affordable units, thereby allowing more units to be built. 

On the supply side, I support inclusionary zoning that requires that some percentage of newly developed housing be set aside for low- and moderate-income families. We need new, mixed-income housing that is accessible to all income levels so that regardless of how you provide for your family, you are not priced out and can all enjoy the wonderful amenities coming to our city.

Finally, 60% of Ward 1 residents are renters so we must also protect our renter’s rights and make sure they are treated equitably and have access to healthy and safe living conditions.

The City Council has taken steps to oversee health and safety in the privately-owned immigrant detention center in north Aurora by mandating it report infectious outbreaks to the fire department. Would you support more measures to oversee the facility? If so, what kind? 

Absolutely. I have not only spoken out against the health and safety issues in the GEO Aurora Detention Center, but supported the ordinance which increased transparency in reporting on communicable diseases to the fire department by Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Other measures I would support, so long as allowed by federal law, include requiring the detention center to report what steps they are taking to contain any health hazards and giving the City the power to take matters into its hands when the City determines the detention center is not doing enough to protect those in the facility.

Proposals to address visible homelessness have ranged from an urban camping ban — which Mayor Mike Coffman has committed to bring back for a second vote — to adding safe parking lots and additional shelter space. Which policies would you be in favor of? Would you support the camping ban? 

I am absolutely against a camping ban. It is not only inhumane but clearly ineffective and a waste of resources. We must focus on actually solving the root causes and implementing best practices. 

Our city must treat people experiencing homelessness with dignity. I have supported and will continue to support a variety of data-driven policies and solutions that help our residents experiencing homelesness. As Chair of our Housing Committee for three years, I methodically commissioned housing inventories and a needs assessment that ultimately led to the passage of our first ever housing strategy. This has allowed us to respond to the housing crisis with innovative ideas like safe camping sites and pallet/tiny homes. I would like the City to implement these ideas to get our unhoused neighbors into safer locations.

I have also supported projects that create affordable housing with wrap-around resources like the Ready2Work program that is a housing first model and help train residents in finding employment, as well as the Providence at the Heights (PATH) project that helps system-involved individuals gain access to stable housing and other support systems. The City must expand on housing-first programs to ensure people do not fall back into the cycle of homelessness.

We also must focus efforts on making sure that we prevent folks from losing their homes in the first place. This means supporting higher wages for our residents and reducing other barriers to greater economic opportunity. The city must also continue maintaining the affordable housing stock that we have now, and simultaneously expand more affordable housing stock for our residents.

Would you support increasing the minimum wage in Aurora? Why? 

Yes, I believe the minimum wage should keep pace with the cost of living.

Nowhere in Aurora can people making a minimum wage afford housing (spend 30% or less of their income on housing.) This can lead to employee abuse, parents working multiple jobs, depression-inducing stress, housing insecurity, and homelessness.

Last year, I supported the effort to gradually increase the minimum wage. Much of the opposing concern was unfortunately pitting business owners versus business workers. If the minimum wage passed, I was willing and ready to continue to work with stakeholders to identify other ways of offsetting costs to businesses, such as subsidizing costs by imposing fees on large industries and corporations like Amazon that saw record-level profits during the COVID-19 pandemic while our small businesses struggled. We cannot sacrifice people’s well-being and survival for profit. We can find a way to support workers and small-local businesses.

Do you support Aurora forming its own county? Why? 

As the third largest city approaching 400K people (and growing), we need to always evaluate the pros and cons of becoming a city and county. The recent vote by Douglas County Commissioners to leave the Tri-County Health Department reignites the consideration of this possibility. Some of my concerns with being part of three district counties is the potential confusion and duplication of services with inconsistent health mandates. Conversely, there could be some fiscal and operational benefits to becoming a city and county.

That being stated, I don’t think we are quite ready to make that decision at this time. We must focus on the immediate needs of Aurora and, for me, Ward 1. Before making this move we would need to have robust public engagement and input. We would need to explore the economic and operational benefits of becoming a city and county through a formal City and County Feasibility Study like we did back in 2014. I would not be surprised to see another push for a city and county in the next 5-10 years. At the end of the day, it’s about making the city work best for the people who live here and if that means consolidating, then let’s do it.

What is the city’s most pressing transportation need? 

According to a 2016 report, most Aurorans travel outside of the city to get to work. Ward 1 residents disproportionately rely on public transit as a means to travel to work. Our roads are significantly congested.I believe the best way we can alleviate traffic, protect the environment, and get people where they need to go is by increasing accessibility to public transportation.

The state of our public transit authority, RTD, is severely lacking. I was appointed and elected by my peers to serve as the RTD Accountability Committee’s Co-Chair. We explored various recommendations, including: creating a free or reduced pass fare structure; implementing local service councils to better engage local communities in public transit decisions; and increasing flexibility in the way RTD collects revenue. These measures would lead to less single occupancy vehicles.

I also recognize the overlap in equitable Transit Oriented Development (TOD) and reducing carbon output. When transit-dependent communities cannot afford to live in the developments closest to transit, they are forced to use more carbon-emitting forms of transportation. Therefore, increasing accessibility to our public transportation is one of our most pressing needs.

Do you think the city does a good job of marketing itself? If not, what can be done differently? Is it important? 

Yes, to a certain extent. The City of Aurora has a marketing department that emphasizes our amenities, beautiful neighborhoods, local businesses, and our events. Additionally, the city puts on many events with focuses on art, food, music, and culture that have high attendance by residents and those outside of the city. I am happy that our city strives to be engaged with our residents.

However, marketing can only go so far when the city faces other turmoil. For example, most, if not all, of the national headlines about Aurora have regarded how our police poorly treat our residents of color. The city can only do so much marketing, and this negative publicity cannot be resolved without first addressing these underlying causes. We must have an equitable city that works for all of our residents for our marketing to be successful....or even meaningful.

Should Aurora limit or ban giving financial incentives to businesses in an effort to lure them to Aurora? Examples where large incentives were offered include the Gaylord and Amazon projects. Critics call these “corporate welfare,” but proponents say they’re a critical part of economic development and creating jobs. 

It depends.

In general, I do not support giving financial incentives to wealthy corporations because it becomes a race to the bottom — we offer more tax breaks to compete with other cities — as they vet out the best deal for them. However, it is not uncommon for the city to be approached with a business incentive deal.

If the city engages in an incentive, I want to ensure that we are incentivizing those that treat their employees with dignity and respect by paying their employees living wages, providing them with fair benefits, and allowing workers to organize in the workplace. I would also fight to have more local hiring goals and push for more materials to be bought locally.

Our residents must have good-paying jobs to thrive and that having them easily accessible is beneficial. As such, I am committed to supporting the small businesses we have here in the city to ensure they continue to stay afloat during the pandemic, just as I have done since the pandemic began. I’d like to continue working with our locally owned businesses to help develop programming that supports their success. There isn’t one size fits all solution but as the Ward I Council Member, I have and will continue to fight so that our economic development benefits Ward I residents.

Crime rates have increased in Aurora in the past two years. What can the city council do to address that problem? How do you think any new proposals related to controlling crime should be funded? 

Study after study shows that crime rates are driven largely by our societal structures and systems, such as low educational attainment, higher rates of poverty, inequality, lack of community support, and unhealthy environments. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Therefore, some of the best ways we can decrease crime rates is by fostering a city with adequate affordable housing, good paying wages, equity in our education system, and support for our marginalized communities.

However, some community members have also expressed concerns as it relates to an equitable response to current issues and crimes in the community. We must act to implement reforms that actually address public safety and move towards a more intersectional and humanizing approach to solve our community problems.

One way I have worked to change this is by supporting programs like CAHOOTS, which sends unarmed first-responder teams of paramedics/mental health professionals to respond to some low-level 911 calls. Having a team of unarmed crisis workers and medics that are trained to deal with such circumstances creates a better response to people struggling with mental health crises.This not only creates greater capacity for our police department to spend their time on more appropriate matters, but it also reduces the chances of escalating the situation. I support building out this program even further, and would support using funds saved by decreasing police enforcement to fund this program.

I supported a foot patrol pilot program that would focus on proactive community policing to build positive relationships with community members. In addition, I also supported an appropriation of city funds for self defense training and safety alarm kits for our AAPI community following the recent surge in anti-Asian hate violence.

With the upcoming infusion of federal dollars through the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA), my goal would be to use some of that funding to help support these programs in the short-term. Long-term, we will, as a City Council, need to take a hard look and reexamine our budget and evaluate what programming is working and what needs to change so we can reallocate resources to programs that actually address crime. We should also explore other revenue generating ideas to support our city’s ongoing needs.

The Aurora Police Department and the Civil Service Commision have been the subject of many high profile incidents – notably regarding the death of Elijah McClain – and consequently the subject of intense scrutiny from investigative reports. Would you support additional oversight of the Aurora Police Department? If so, what do you think that should look like? 

Absolutely, I would support additional oversight of the Aurora Police Department.

The relationship between our residents and the Aurora Police Department is broken. I am unflinching in my commitment to hold our police accountable so that all our residents are treated with the dignity and respect they deserve.

The recent report by the Colorado Attorney General found a consistent pattern of illegal behavior by Aurora Police, including disproportionate use of force against our residents of color. This is unacceptable. I believe that we must use city funds to focus less on enforcement and more on training to transform the police department.

More about Crystal Murillo

What was the last book you read? Becoming by Michelle Obama (half of it was an audiobook I listened to during my commute to work).

What has been your pandemic guilty pleasure? 

I have really enjoyed binge watching historical dramas on Netflix with my dogs next to me while eating ice cream sandwiches.

If you were stuck on a deserted island, what are three things you would want tobring? 

I would bring: 1) a lighter or large box of matches to start a fire to cook, boil water and keep warm;

2) a knife to prepare food, protect myself and build a shelter; and

3) a tarp to build a shelter with and to keep the elements away from me.

What do you think needs to be invented more than anything? 

There is research that certain fungi and bacteria can help break down and decompose plastics in as little as a few weeks. Though it’s not a new invention per se, we need to continue researching new processes and techniques like this one to address our long-term sustainability. I believe that we ultimately need to change our behaviors to address climate change, but in the meantime, we need to address the incredible amount of plastic in our communities.

If you were going to staycation in Aurora, what activities would you do?

 Aurora has so many wonderful amenities. If I were doing a staycation, I would plan activities for me and my dogs to enjoy. We’d go to the Aurora or Quincy Reservoir to go kayaking and enjoy the nice weather. I would also go on one of our many trails like the Sand Creek Trail or the HIghline Canal. I would invite my friends along to a progressive dinner starting with appetizers somewhere along the Havana Corridor, then off to Colfax for the entree, and grab a dessert at the Stanley Marketplace. I’d end the night at the Stampede for a live performance.

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DICK MOORE
DICK MOORE
1 month ago

Murillo is currently the youngest card carrying socialist on City Council.

Let’s work hard to remove all socialists from City Council. Murillo will tell you she is a Democrat but she is really a socialist.

Jeff Ryan
Jeff Ryan
1 month ago
Reply to  DICK MOORE

Have you seen this “card” that she carries? Can you define “socialism”?

Since you oppose “socialism”, may we assume you refuse things like Medicare and Social Security?

CoPete
CoPete
1 month ago

I believe she was the most absent council member at council meetings. She didn’t mind getting paid but she preferred not to attend meetings.

Dean
1 month ago
Reply to  CoPete

CoPete you are correct. For whatever reason her problem to not attend meetings is noteworthy. Last year before the Covid stopped the in person council meetings Council Woman Hiltz made a bold move at a meeting stating directly to Murillo, she had missed to many committee meetings she is on and should be reprimanded. Ms Murillo immediately shot back at CM Hiltz with– she was not in a position to be critical and disrespectful of her busy schedule as Ward 1, and as the youngest city rep, so-don’t-mess- with-me – yadda yadda.. This started the cat fight for the evenings meeting. New blood for Ward 1, is probably in order, we can all agree on one thing, Ward 1, is the most crime infested Ward in Aurora. Defunding APD, in the ward pretty well promises more of the same. APD does keep detailed records of overall crime across the city wards. Anyone can access these reports they’re not secret.